For Those Who Missed – 2014 April 29 Solar Eclipse Now in Video

  @ibtimesau on
  • A man talks to a visitor in front of a screen displaying the partial solar eclipse as seen from the city of Perth during a gathering of amateur astronomers at Sydney's Observatory Hill April 29, 2014. Australia experienced a partial solar eclipse, with ar
  • A girl looks through a telescope to try and see a partial solar eclipse from Sydney's Observatory Hill April 29, 2014. Australia experienced a partial solar eclipse, with around two thirds of the sun obscured by the moon, during the late afternoon until s
  • A boy looks through a telescope to try and see a partial solar eclipse from Sydney's Observatory Hill April 29, 2014. Australia experienced a partial solar eclipse, with around two thirds of the sun obscured by the moon, during the late afternoon until su
  • Children wear protective glasses, that bear the date of the last total solar eclipse in Australia in November 2012, as they try to see a partial solar eclipse from Sydney's Observatory Hill April 29, 2014. Australia experienced a partial solar eclipse, wi
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Australia and parts of Indonesia had a partial eclipse of the sun on Tuesday, April 29, 2014. Naturally not everyone was able to see it. Still good news for those who weren't able to see it, they can now be viewed in videos online.

Yesterday's annular solar eclipse occurred over a 500-kilometre wide region in Antarctica. It was the first of two solar eclipses and four eclipses total set to happen in 2014.

The very first eclipse for the year was the April 15 total lunar eclipse.

Despite rain and clouds dampened hopes and attempts to view the eclipse from much of southern Australia, residents in Queensland to the east and areas around Perth to the west still pretty much were able to get a fine view when clouds parted long enough.

For the timelapse video of the eclipse courtesy of Proba-2 of the European Space Agency and the Royal Observatory of Belgium, watch the video here.

The full video eclipse, courtesy of the Virtual Telescope Project, is here.

The next space event being monitored is on May 3 when a 10-metre large asteroid called 2014 HL129 will make a very close approach with the Earth, reaching a minimum distance of less than 300.000 km, which is 0.7 lunar distances.

Read: Australia In for a Solar Eclipse Spectacle

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