Power Supply Back in Central Alberta after 4.3-Magnitude Earthquake

By @ibtimesau on
Camels graze near power lines in the village of al-Thamama near Riyadh May 11, 2014. Saudi Arabia said people handling camels should wear masks and gloves to prevent spreading Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), issuing such a warning for the first t
Camels graze near power lines in the village of al-Thamama near Riyadh May 11, 2014. Saudi Arabia said people handling camels should wear masks and gloves to prevent spreading Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), issuing such a warning for the first time as cases in the kingdom of the potentially fatal virus neared 500. REUTERS/Faisal Al Nasser Reuters/Faisal Al Nasser

Power supply has been restored in Central Alberta after a 4.3-magnitude earthquake struck the area on Saturday morning.

The quake, according to Natural Resources Canada, struck 9:28 a.m. MT. It was felt in Rocky Mountain House, a town with a population of 7,000 people, located west of Red Deer between Edmonton and Calgary.

Local resident Betty, according to portal www.newstalk770.com reported she felt the temblor.  She initially thought a car had hit her home, located 17 miles southwest of the town.

"There are no reports of damage, and none would be expected," Natural Resources Canada said on its website.

The only interruption was on the power supply to the area, when a substation shutdown at a gas plant near Rockey Mountain House. Some 500 customers were affected of the sudden power shutdown.

Power was immediately restored by 11:21 a.m.

"We are aware that there was some flaring of natural gas that occurred at industry plants likely as a result of the power failure but there was no risk to the public or environment," Ted Hickey, Clearwater County's Director of Community and Protective Services, told CTV News.

One of these facilities was the Strachan gas plant, operated by Keyara Corp. Julie Puddell, a spokesperson for Keyara, said the gas flare was regarded as a safety measure.

The Alberta Environment had been contacted to monitor air quality, Puddell said.

Earthquakes are seldom felt in Alberta, CBC News quoted Honn Kao with the Geological Survey of Canada. "Most people actually don't feel it and therefore they seem to get the impression that Alberta is seismically inactive, which is actually not true," Kao said.

"We have detected enough small earthquakes in Alberta, especially in the areas close to the Rocky Mountains."

Join the Discussion