Lance Armstrong Lives a Quiet and Normal Life Post-PED Scandal

By @EntengBulagting on
U.S actor Robin Williams (R) jokes with U.S. Postal rider Lance Armstrong before the start of the 15th stage of the Tour de France between Valreas and Villard-de-Lans, in this file picture taken July 20, 2004. Oscar-winning actor and comedian Robin Willia
U.S actor Robin Williams (R) jokes with U.S. Postal rider Lance Armstrong before the start of the 15th stage of the Tour de France between Valreas and Villard-de-Lans, in this file picture taken July 20, 2004. Oscar-winning actor and comedian Robin Williams was found dead on August 11, 2014 from an apparent suicide at his home in Northern California, Marin County Sheriff's Office said. He was 63. REUTERS

Lance Armstrong is moving on from all the recent controversy and living a normal life 18 months after his admission of using performance enhancing drugs. This does not mean that the former famed cyclist is out of the legal woods, yet.

The athlete who was stripped of seven Tour de France victories due to his admission is constantly preparing for any civil suits that will come his way. He is still facing a whistle blower lawsuit that claims that he and his former cycling team defrauded the government when he used banned performance enhancing drugs.

A federal judge dismissed the bid of Armstrong to drop the charges in June. The disgraced world-renowned athlete insists that the U.S. postal service, his former sponsor, had raked in a lot of earnings from the exposure it got from the deal.

Nevertheless, the fallen star is now living a quiet life in London. The cancer survivor and former idol of million is still recuperating from the effects of the PED scandal that cost him his career and his chance to compete at any cycling competition. Armstrong has been banned form racing in 2012 by the U.S. Anti-Doping agency. During an interview with CNN, he reveals that he goes about his daily routine without having experienced taunting or heckling from strangers, which at first he expected to happen.

"I never get crap, not once, and I'm surprised by that," Armstrong told CNN on Tuesday. "Sure, I sometimes get the vibe that someone wants to say something but it's never happened."

While some of the minor legal battles he faced after his admission have been resolved, the biggest one is looming in the horizon. The U.S. Postal service case could have financial ramifications of up to £100M which could empty out the estate and earnings of the former cyclist. Armstrong truly believes that his team can hurdle the battle.

In fact, he declares that all the years he worked for, the said agency rode his coattails all the way to the finish line.

"I worked my ass off for them and I'm proud of it. Furthermore there wasn't a technical relationship between myself and the U.S. Postal Service," Armstrong said.

Join the Discussion