IOC Dismayed Over Rio 2016 Olympics Preparations, ‘Worst Ever,’ IOC Demands Ridiculous

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  • Explosives are detonated to demolish part of the Perimetral overpass, as part of Rio's Porto Maravilha (Marvelous Port) urbanisation project, in Rio de Janeiro April 20, 2014. The project is for the city's redevelopment ahead of the 2016 Olympic Games. RE
    Explosives are detonated to demolish part of the Perimetral overpass, as part of Rio's Porto Maravilha (Marvelous Port) urbanisation project, in Rio de Janeiro April 20, 2014. The project is for the city's redevelopment ahead of the 2016 Olympic Games. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
  • Soccer shoes are seen on a fence as residents watch the Copa Popular soccer tournament, or People's Cup, held between slums, at the Santa Marta slum in Rio de Janeiro April 27, 2014. About 10 slums participated in the sporting event organized by the Peopl
    Soccer shoes are seen on a fence as residents watch the Copa Popular soccer tournament, or People's Cup, held between slums, at the Santa Marta slum in Rio de Janeiro April 27, 2014. About 10 slums participated in the sporting event organized by the People's Committee for the World Cup and Olympic Games, a collection of activists from civil societies and labour movements, to protest against the effects of real estate speculation caused by the flow of capital accompanying the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics, according to organizers. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes REUTERS/Sergio Moraes
  • Construction workers on strike stand outside the Rio 2016 Olympic Park construction site in Rio de Janeiro April 8, 2014. Workers building Rio's 2016 Olympic Park fought with security guards on Monday but although shots were fired no one was injured in th
    Construction workers on strike stand outside the Rio 2016 Olympic Park construction site in Rio de Janeiro April 8, 2014. Workers building Rio's 2016 Olympic Park fought with security guards on Monday but although shots were fired no one was injured in the melee, eyewitnesses said. Scuffles broke out between guards and construction workers on strike for more pay and better union representation. The workers closed several busy avenues around the site on Monday and trouble ensued. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
  • Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne (L) talks with the CEO of the London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) Paul Deighton during a visit to the Maracana Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, April 7, 2014. REUTERS/Ricar
    Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne (L) talks with the CEO of the London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) Paul Deighton during a visit to the Maracana Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, April 7, 2014. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
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With roughly only 24 months to go, the International Olympic Committee is wondering if Rio de Janeiro will ever be able to complete its preparations in time for the 2016 Olympic Games. An IOC senior official has blasted the country's preparations for the global games as the worst ever that he has seen so far.

The civil unrest and governmental chaos in Brazil had spilled over preparations for the games, rendering construction delays of sporting venues. Soaring costs and how it should be shouldered among the municipal, state and federal governments are also dampening factors.

"The situation is critical on the ground," John Oates, an IOC vice president from Australia, said  "We have become very concerned. They are not ready in many, many ways. We have to make it happen and that is the IOC's approach. You can't walk away from this."

The concern might really be so huge that the IOC sent a number of its executives to oversee how preparations are being made at the South American country.

But Eduardo Paes, Rio mayor, said some of the delays were caused by the IOC's huge demands.

"Probably these federations will keep complaining about me until the day the Olympics start, because sometimes they want us to do things that are too large," Mr Paes said. "They are making demands about the stadiums, but I will not accept them."

He cited the 20,000-seat tennis facility the IOC wanted built for the Olympics. Mr Paes found it impractical and thus downsized it to 10,000.

"We are not going to deliver glamorous stadiums that will become 'white elephants' in the future, like Beijing did with the 'Birds' Nest,'" Mr Paes said. The Birds' Nest is the 90,000-seat Chinese monstrosity now unused except for spiders' cobwebs.

"My focus is on the legacy for my city," Mr Paes said. "The demands are about the stadiums."

When Rio de Janeiro submitted its bid, it said it would spend about $15 billion for the 2016 Olympic Games.

"The IOC has adopted a more 'hands-on' role," Mr Coates said. "It is unprecedented for the IOC but there is no Plan B. We are going to Rio."

As expected, the local organising committee for the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics vowed to speed up.

"The time has now passed when general discussions about the progress of preparations contribute to the journey towards the Games," the organising committee said in a statement. "It is time for us to focus on the work to be done and on engaging with society."

"We have a historic mission: to organize the first Olympic and Paralympic Games in Brazil and in South America. We are going to achieve this," the LOC said.

"In 2016, Rio will host excellent Games that will be delivered absolutely within the agreed timelines and budgets," it added.

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