Death Due To Ice Bucket Challenge Story Is Hoax; Alleged Victim Alive

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By Vittorio Hernandez | September 1, 2014 7:56 AM EST

Philippine's Secretary of Justice Leila De Lima reacts after she had a bucket of iced water dumped on her for the ALS ice bucket challenge during a break at the Department of Justice headquarters in Manila August 26, 2014. The Ice Bucket Challenge is aimed at raising awareness of - and money to fight - Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, more often known as ALS or Lou Gehrig's Disease. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco (PHILIPPINES - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY HEALTH)
Philippine's Secretary of Justice Leila De Lima reacts after she had a bucket of iced water dumped on her for the ALS ice bucket challenge during a break at the Department of Justice headquarters in Manila August 26, 2014. The Ice Bucket Challenge is aimed at raising awareness of - and money to fight - Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, more often known as ALS or Lou Gehrig's Disease. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco (PHILIPPINES - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY HEALTH)

Two weeks ago, 19-year-old college student Therese Todd from Silver Spring was nominated for the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, and she complied.  Unfortunately, her challenge was an epic failure because the big water container with icy water inside fell from the porch while water was being poured and the blue container hit Todd on the head.

The video showed Todd fall to the ground, and the 22-second video clip posted on YouTube and Facebook stopped, which would make viewers wonder if Todd was badly injured by the container hit on her head.

She was rushed to a hospital and after an X-ray and CT scan, the emergency room doctor said that Todd was fine, Washington Post reports.

Her epic failure resulted in 2.3 million hits so far for the video, but a hoax news site Daily Buzz Live made two "errors" in reporting the incident. The portal wrote that she was from Mississippi and she died as a result of the challenge.

To top it all, some viewers really believed she died based on the hoax story, which had been shared on Facebook over 18,000 times, based on the comments they made such as:

"One more for ALS, now claiming the lives of those who don't even have it."

"Look at her freaking neck ... did her head come off? ... SHE GOT DECAPITATED."

The hoax story led to Todd's friends deluging her with text messages confirming if she really died from the Ice Bucket Challenge gone wrong. Although she said the container hit cost her to lose consciousness and tests showed she was fine, Todd is experiencing some back pain which she plans to seek medical help.

The 15-year-old male from whose hands the container slipped is the brother of her friend, while the 5-year-old girl who joined her in the cold splash is the boy's brother. The young girl is fine.

However, she shared that two of the three people she nominated for the ALS challenge has not done it, perhaps afraid the challenge may also go wrong.

Her friends cannot be blamed because besides Todd, there have been other ice bucket failures, as seen in this video compilation below.

YouTube/Mr Weekly Vines - [ Best Vines ]

There are, however, some criticisms to the challenge - which aims to raise money and awareness for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis - such as giving money is only a second option, while some of those who enjoyed the icy water dump even enjoyed social media fame while they did not gain more understanding of the disease that attacks the motor neurons along the spine which causes loss of muscle control and potential total paralysis or how to overcome the ailment.

The stunt, though, has raised $1.35 million since July for the ALS Association, more than 6,000 times the $22,000 it raised in 2013 for the same period.

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(Photo: Reuters / Romeo Ranoco)
Philippine's Secretary of Justice Leila De Lima reacts after she had a bucket of iced water dumped on her for the ALS ice bucket challenge during a break at the Department of Justice headquarters in Manila August 26, 2014. The Ice Bucket Challenge is aimed at raising awareness of - and money to fight - Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, more often known as ALS or Lou Gehrig's Disease.
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