Cameron May Seek EU Reform or Exit for Britain

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By Kalyan Kumar | August 27, 2014 5:23 PM EST

British Prime Minister David Cameron is reportedly studying the options to leave the European Union (EU).

The Daily Mail reported that the upcoming Congress of his Conservative Party will be decisive in this regard. London has been feeling dictated by Brussells and wanted control of several areas where the EU bloc is exercising powers.

Reuters
Britain's Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond (R) walks with Australia's Prime Minister Tony Abbott in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, in central London August 12, 2014.

The Times newspaper reported that Cameron wants to speak strongly to pave way for a separation of UK from the EU institutions. In January 2013, Cameron announced that a referendum will be undertaken in mid-2017 to decide whether United Kingdom should continue in the EU. This was subject to a victory of the Conservatives in the general election of 2015.

The Conservative Party Congress would be the venue to further beef up this position and demand repatriation of more prerogatives from the European bloc.

Juncker Issue

David Cameron was not happy with the candidacy of Jean-Claude Juncker as president of the European Commission earlier this year. Juncker is perceived as an arch federalist by the UK, wanting more powers for Brussels.  The British PM wants Britain to be freed from an ever closer union and wants powers flowing from Brussels rather than to it. The UK also wants to end the red tape and agrees to freedom of movement within the Union without the mandatory right for unemployment privileges. 

London Mayor Boris Johnson is an articulate supporter of the UK leaving EU.  He recently called on the prime minister to declare that he wanted UK to walk away from the EU.

Johnson banked on a report that said British exit from the European Union would be better than staying in an unreformed institution. The economic adviser to the mayor, Gerard Lyons, also said leaving the EU is a viable option but comes second to staying in a successfully reformed Union.

Generous Exit

Lyons asserted that the UK could negotiate a generous exit from the EU, while giving access to the European common market without having political ties.

Johnson also expressed preference to stay in a reformed EU, in which Britain is open not just to the rest of Europe but to the world with its vast potential for goods and services originating in London.

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(Photo: Reuters / Justin Tallis)
Britain's Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond (R) walks with Australia's Prime Minister Tony Abbott in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, in central London August 12, 2014.
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