How A Russian Family Took In And Tamed A Pack Of Wolves

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By Usha Hari | August 27, 2014 12:04 PM EST

Meet a Russian family that has successfully tamed a brood of wild wolves and keep them as pets. This amazing story in the village of Zacherevye, 250 km north of Minsk, Russia would look a lot more like the fictional kingdom of Winterfell from HBO's "Game of Thrones."

Alisa Selekh  has become very close to the wolves since her father, Oleg, a gamekeeper, took in a group of young wild wolves in 2009. The whole village comes running to see the amazing spectacle of the 10-year-old Alisa Selekh riding on wolf's back at her garden. Alisa shares a wonderful rapport with these wild and ferocious animals of the wild. She rolls with them in the grass and share a kiss with these beasts that are infamous for their sharp teeth and ravenous appetite for flesh. In five years the wolves have become completely domesticated and live with the Selekhs family as their pets.

Wolves the bigger and wilder cousins of dogs are difficult to domesticate as they are instinctively wild. The pack has a strict code of conduct based on hierarchy within their pack and is the most social of all carnivores in the wild.

Unlike many other pack animal species, male and female wolves have equal operational role within their group and a wolf pack will thus be led by an alpha couple rather than an alpha male.

The alpha couple leads the pack during a hunt and often eats first when a kill is made. The alpha wolves are the only wolves in the pack to have pups. In the hierarchy alpha wolf is followed by the beta wolf, which can be male or female and at the bottom rank is the omega wolf. Functioning as a pack, they ensure that each member has a distinct role. The sharp teeth and their ruthless strength make wolves highly dangerous to small animals in the wild. They can even attack weak or injured predators like lions.

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