MH 370 Kin Forms Self Help Social Media Group: New Book Asserts Passengers Were Starved of Oxygen Before Drowning

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By Kalyan Kumar | August 25, 2014 2:12 PM EST

The saga of MH 370, the missing plane of Malaysia Airlines bound for Beijing, continues with hundreds of relatives of the victims joining hands to launch a social media citizen campaign towards the resolution of the great mystery in aviation history.

Reuters
Co-Pilot Flying Officer Marc Smith (L) and crewmen fly at high altitude aboard a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) AP-3C Orion aircraft after searching for the missing Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 over the southern Indian Ocean March 24, 2014. An Australian aircraft scouring the southern Indian Ocean for signs of a Malaysia Airlines jet missing for more than two weeks has spotted two new objects, Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott said on Monday. Abbott told parliament an Australian naval vessel was near where the objects, one circular and greenish grey in colour and the second orange and rectangular, had been seen and hoped to be able to recover them soon. Picture taken March 24, 2014.

Voice 370

Asia One reported that Weibo, a Chinese microblogging site, has set up a closed Facebook group made up of family members of 153 Chinese passengers who were aboard the MH370. 

Named as Voice370, the group has 300 members. They hold Skype meetings to exchange thoughts, findings, media reports and proposals for group action.

One active participant in the group is Jimmy Wang who lost his father Wang Lijun in the ill fated plane. Wang abandoned his studies in Sweden to be with his grieving mother. Today, Wang spends most of his time in China, exploring aviation blogs and sharing information with the affected in the MH370 mystery. There is a collective solidarity and mutual care from the initiative.

Starved of Oxygen

Meanwhile, the reverberation of the book Goodnight Malaysian 370 by two New Zealanders, Evan Wilson and Geoff Taylor, continues to rattle the minds of the concerned.  It was in the last week that The Daily Mail came out with the findings of these authors.

Evan Wilson is a former pilot. According to their version, the pilot Ahmad Shah was mentally sick and tricked his co-pilot Fariq Hamid for break, about 40 minutes from the take-off.

Locking out the co-pilot, Ahmad Shah allegedly made the last broadcast to air traffic control - 'Goodnight, Malaysian 370' - and snapped the aircraft's air-to-ground communication links.

Thereafter, Shah took the MH370 flight to an altitude of 39,000 feet and de-pressurised the aircraft. This crushed the oxygen level and left the passengers and crew with less than 60 seconds in a state of useful consciousness, leading to death.

Shah kept himself safe and made a planned ditching of the plane into the sea to sink the plane one piece without leaving any debris. According to the analysis made by Ewans, all the 239 people lost consciousness, some four hours before the Boeing 777 sank into the ocean.

As an independent study by an air accident investigator, Ewan Wilson's findings assume significance. He arrived at the shocking conclusion after considering "every possible alternative scenario."

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(Photo: Reuters / Richard Wainwright)
Co-Pilot Flying Officer Marc Smith (L) and crewmen fly at high altitude aboard a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) AP-3C Orion aircraft after searching for the missing Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 over the southern Indian Ocean March 24, 2014. An Australian aircraft scouring the southern Indian Ocean for signs of a Malaysia Airlines jet missing for more than two weeks has spotted two new objects, Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott said on Monday. Abbott told parliament an Australian naval vessel was near where the objects, one circular and greenish grey in colour and the second orange and rectangular, had been seen and hoped to be able to recover them soon. Picture taken March 24, 2014.
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