Autistic Business Owners Capitalize On Strengths For Success

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By Usha Hari | August 22, 2014 4:37 PM EST

Though autism is relatively common, there are many misconceptions on this condition even today. Some people believe that autistic people could be violent or unable to follow instructions or pursue career options. Mild autism wont hinder normal schooling or interaction and they do well in colleges. They are well suited for jobs that focus on details rather than interactive types of jobs that may require them to meet customers or interact with colleagues. 

Reuters
Autistic children take part in the Horse Therapy Special Children program in Bangkok June 17, 2014

An incredible movement that strives to find work for autistic people and even help them start their own business is gaining momentum in the US. Work requiring an attention to detail and with repetitive tasks is ideal for an autistic person who wants to start a business, says Gregg Ireland, co-founder of Extraordinary Ventures, a Chapel Hill, North Carolina-based organization that creates jobs for the autistic.

Government figures say one in 68 people have some form of autism, which is found to be more common in males than in females. Autism can be of various types and levels. While some have difficult in understanding written and spoken words others have problems in speech and interaction.

Autistic people can be successful business entrepreneurs owners if their interests are developed and turned into a living, says Temple Grandin, whom herself was diagnosed with autism at an age of 4. She has a successful business designing systems to handle livestock at present and is one of the strongest advocates in the country for the cause of autistic people.

Advocacy groups strove to create business and job opportunities that are well suited for autistic people. The Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center, based in Phoenix, which has offices in Los Angeles, New York, Princeton, New Jersey helps people with autism to start home-based food businesses. Regular meetings are held for autistic people to introduce them to various business ideas and employment opportunities.

(Photo: Reuters / Chaiwat Subprasom)
Autistic children take part in the Horse Therapy Special Children program in Bangkok June 17, 2014
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