Ferguson Ethnic Riots In USA Give Rivals the Opportunity to Thrash US Human Rights Record

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By Kalyan Kumar | August 21, 2014 2:50 PM EST

The Ferguson riots are hitting hard on the grandstanding on the US government due to Human Rights issues.  The riots that started on Aug. 9 was triggered by the shooting of an unarmed, black teenager named Michael Brown, by a white police officer. Since then, the Missouri suburb has been a scene of turmoil with recurring protests, violence, riots and loots leading to more clashes with the police.

Reuters
U.S. President Barack Obama delivers a statement from Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, during his vacation August 20, 2014. Obama on Wednesday vowed that the United States will not be swayed from airstrikes against Islamic State after the group beheaded an American journalist, an act he said is proof that the militants stand for no religion. Obama's response to the execution of James Foley marked his strongest condemnation yet of Islamic State militants, and he gave no sign of a pause in U.S. targeting of militant positions in Iraq.

The riots soon became a matter of global focus.

Amnesty International  

The US is worrying the Ferguson riots will turn into a blot on its rights record. Amnesty International, for the first time in history, deployed observers in US soil to monitor the racial surcharged situation in Ferguson.  

Interestingly, Ferguson became a convenient issue for many countries to snipe at US and gave it in the same coin. Many of them were at the receiving end of the US on matters of human rights.   

Egypt: Cairo retaliated with the same language that Washington used while condemning it in 2013, when it faced protests from Islamist demonstrators and deaths of Muslim Brotherhood cadres.

China: China comments on Ferguson and called it a chronic disease that is tearing the US society apart, published the Xinhua news service. China has given a sermon to the US that each country has its own national conditions that may trigger different social problems. The United States should concentrate on solving their own problems rather than pointing fingers at others, they added.

Iran: Iran's top leader, Ayatollah Seyed Ali Khamenei, took to Twitter his conspiracy theory and put the responsibility of this incident at the door of the Jewish control on the American government.

Healing Touch

Meanwhile, the irate protestors of Ferguson had some relief. The US Attorney General Eric Holder headed to the disturbed Missouri areas on Wednesday and interacted with the affected groups and general public.

The AP report said the the Justice Department under Holder has a better record of acting swiftly in assuaging the concerns of the black citizens. His office sent many teams of prosecutors and dozens of FBI agents to investigate the incident. It also intervened to arrange a federal autopsy on top of the local authorities. For the victims, Holder's track record in handling civil rights breaches will be more reassuring.

Before proceeding to Ferguson, Holder wrote an open letter that promised a 'fair investigation' into the death of Brown. Under the US Federal law, the accused white police officer can be prosecuted, even if murder charges may be spared.

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(Photo: Reuters / Kevin Lamarque)
U.S. President Barack Obama delivers a statement from Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, during his vacation August 20, 2014. Obama on Wednesday vowed that the United States will not be swayed from airstrikes against Islamic State after the group beheaded an American journalist, an act he said is proof that the militants stand for no religion. Obama's response to the execution of James Foley marked his strongest condemnation yet of Islamic State militants, and he gave no sign of a pause in U.S. targeting of militant positions in Iraq.
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