'Dirty Politics' Scandal Eating Into National Party’s Prospects: Poll Surveys

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By Kalyan Kumar | August 20, 2014 2:18 PM EST

In the run-up to the New Zealand elections, the ruling National Party with its aura of invincibility has suddenly taken a beat, and ceded at least a couple of points to the main Opposition party.

Two recent poll surveys have come out with the one showing Labour Party recovering from its lows even before the Dirty Politics scandal hit the ruling National Party.

REUTERS/Brendon Thorne
New Zealand's Prime Minister John Key speaks at a luncheon in Sydney February 7, 2014. REUTERS

3 News Reid Research Survey

In the latest 3News Reid Research poll, National Party has been shown losing almost 2 points to 47.5 per cent, while Labour improved the position by two points to touch 29 per cent.

The poll was conducted in the week that ended on Aug 13. Interestingly, this was the week that showed National Party caught in the whirlwind of a political storm unleashed by Nicky Hager's book that alleged a dirty campaign against political foes of the government, in collusion with a leading blogger.

The allegations in the book linked blogger Cameron Slater with Prime Minister John Key's office and Justice Minister Judith Collins. The survey showed that the Green Party was touching 13 per cent and 4.5 per cent by NZ First. .

Surprisingly, Mr Key's personal support was not affected, and it was up by 0.3 per cent to touch 44.1 per cent. The rating of Labour Leader David Cunliffe improved, and he clocked 9.9 per cent national approval.

NZ First Leader Winston Peter preference as a prime minister candidate rose 1.4 per cent to 6.7 per cent in the week.

One News Poll

The One News Colmar Brunton also revealed the setback for National as it was down by two points and touched 50 per cent. Labour lost two points, and touched 26 per cent. The Greens one point to 11 per cent, and NZ First was up by one point, hitting the 5 per cent mark.

The Internet- Mana Party alliance doubled its support to 4 per cent. The Conservatives stood at two per cent, while the Maori and Act parties were hooked to one per cent. This One News poll came before the release of Nicky Hager's controversial book titled Dirty Politics.

 

 

 

 

 

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(Photo: REUTERS/Brendon Thorne / )
New Zealand's Prime Minister John Key speaks at a luncheon in Sydney February 7, 2014. REUTERS
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