The Woman Who Kept Robin William's Ego Under Check: After Effects of Celebrity Ego -- Study [ Watch Video]

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By Indrani Bhattacharyya | August 14, 2014 1:03 PM EST

It has been found that the body of ace actor Robin William was discovered by his close friend and personal assistant Rebecca Erwin Spencer.

According to the report by Radar online, 57 year old Rebecca worked with the Oscar winner for years and was the first to find out about his shocking death.

Reuters
Robin Williams gestures during a panel discussion for his upcoming HBO show "Robin Williams: Weapons of Self-Destruction" at the Television Critics Association Cable summer press tour in Pasadena, July 30, 2009.

Rebecca who worked with William for the last two decades was completely trusted by him and she was the one who played a significant role to keep the actor grounded.

Celebrities are known for their extreme egos; Rebecca being his closest associate, used to keep his ego in check mostly by calling him with the pet name, 'Mork Guy', in reference to his renowned role in Mork and Mindy.

According to the report by Daily Mail, a long term friend of Robin and Rebecca who did not want to be identified confirmed about the devotion of Rebecca towards his employer.

“Rebecca was incredibly close to Robin. She used to live In San Francisco, but when Robin moved out to Tiburon, she moved to a place about five minutes away,” he was quoted saying.

Rebecca worked as Williams' assistant in more than 33 films, including his Oscar winning role for Good Will Hunting and was praised by the actor when he accepted the Cecil B. DeMille lifetime achievement award from the Golden Globes in 2005.

In that speech, the comedian thanked the Foreign Press Association for honoring his work, paid tribute to his family and credited Rebecca with keeping his ego in check by calling him “Hey, Mork Guy.”

When it comes to celebrity ego, things often go out of control. The fame, excessive exposure to limelight, less privacy makes life difficult for celebrities.

A study by Donna Rockwell from Michigan School of Professional Psychology and David C. Giles from University of Winchester got published in the journal of Phenomenological Psychology in 2009 , found that living the life of a celebrity means loss of privacy, demanding expectations, gratification of ego needs and symbolic immortality.

“Areas of psychological concern for celebrity mental health include character-splitting, mistrust, isolation, and an unwillingness to give up fame. Being-in-the-world of celebrity is a process involving four temporal phases: love/hate, addiction, acceptance, and adaptation,” the study suggested.

Ego can be really a destructive force if goes unchecked, not only for celebrities even for commoners like us.

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(Photo: Reuters / Mario Anzuoni)
Robin Williams gestures during a panel discussion for his upcoming HBO show "Robin Williams: Weapons of Self-Destruction" at the Television Critics Association Cable summer press tour in Pasadena, July 30, 2009.
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