Muslim Leader Calls Australian Activist 'Lunatic' after He Posted Photo of Son Holding Cut off Head of Syrian Soldier

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By Sounak Mukhopadhyay | August 12, 2014 2:47 PM EST

An Aussie activist who is working with ISIS in Iraq posted his seven-year-old son's photo online, where the young boy is seen holding the cut off head of a Syrian soldier.

REUTERS/Rodi Said
A displaced child from minority Yazidi sect, fleeing violence from forces loyal to Islamic State in Sinjar town, rests as she makes her way, on the outskirts of Sinjar mountain, near the Syrian border town of Elierbeh of Al-Hasakah Governorate August 10, 2014. Islamic State militants have killed at least 500 members of Iraq's Yazidi ethnic minority during their offensive in the north, Iraq's human rights minister told Reuters on Sunday. The Islamic State, which has declared a caliphate in parts of Iraq and Syria, has prompted tens of thousands of Yazidis and Christians to flee for their lives during their push to within a 30-minute drive of the Kurdish regional capital Arbil. Picture taken August 10, 2014.

Khaled Sharrouf, the Australian convict, captioned the photo on Twitter: "That's my boy." Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott is also among several others who denounced the image. Abbott called the photo "barbaric." A Muslim leader, on the other hand, called it an act of a "lunatic."

Abbott condemned the image which apparently proved the Iraqi government's claim that it had "striking evidence" that more than 500 people from the Yazidi ethnic minority group had been slaughtered by ISIS. The government also claimed that ISIS' atrocity included burning children and women alive. Abbott, on the other hand, said that the image was a confirmation of how "barbaric" ISIS had been.

Defence Minister David Johnston, meanwhile, warned people that such images might present a false impression about Islam. Johnston, however, said that he was "revolted" by the image but the image presented "a shocking misrepresentation of Islam."

Lebanese Muslim Association president Samier Dandan said that he was disturbed to see the image. "I stand very far from that concept - this is an act of a lunatic," he said, "Even if you are saying to me he made his son lift or carry and take a picture with a decapitated head this is something reflective of something we can all agree - this is an act of a lunatic."

According to Opposition Leader Bill Shorten, every Australian was "shocked to their core" by the image. He referred to The Australian publishing the image on the front page. "First of all, I think every Australian was shocked to their core at that dreadful image of the former Australian citizen Kahled Sharrouff and his son and that dreadful image on the front page of The Australian," Shorten said, "As a parent, I have no idea how you could ever let your child be in that situation. I think that's shocking."

Contact the writer: s.mukhopadhyay@IBTimes.com.au

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(Photo: REUTERS/Rodi Said / )
A displaced child from minority Yazidi sect, fleeing violence from forces loyal to Islamic State in Sinjar town, rests as she makes her way, on the outskirts of Sinjar mountain, near the Syrian border town of Elierbeh of Al-Hasakah Governorate August 10, 2014. Islamic State militants have killed at least 500 members of Iraq's Yazidi ethnic minority during their offensive in the north, Iraq's human rights minister told Reuters on Sunday. The Islamic State, which has declared a caliphate in parts of Iraq and Syria, has prompted tens of thousands of Yazidis and Christians to flee for their lives during their push to within a 30-minute drive of the Kurdish regional capital Arbil. Picture taken August 10, 2014.
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