Children’s Decapitated Heads Mounted on Sticks in a Mosul Park in Iraq

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By Athena Yenko | August 11, 2014 3:57 PM EST

Horrific details emerged out of a park in Mosul, Iraq where decapitated heads of children were mounted on sticks.

"They are systematically beheading children, and mothers and fathers. The world hasn't seen an evil like this for a generation. There's actually a park in Mosul that they've actually beheaded children and put their heads on a stick," National spokesman for Iraqi Christians and Chaldean-American businessman, Mark Arabo, told CNN in a video.

REUTERS/Ari Jala
Displaced families from the minority Yazidi sect, fleeing the violence in the Iraqi town of Sinjarl west of Mosul, arrive at Dohuk province, August 4, 2014. Iraq's Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki ordered his air force for the first time to back Kurdish forces against Islamic State fighters after the Sunni militants made another dramatic push through the north, state television reported on Monday.

Arabo highlighted that the appalling deed by the ISIS involved crimes against humanity. He had called for the people around the world to come together against the militants. He said that what is currently happening in Christians and other minorities in Iraq does not just constitute crimes against community or religion but crimes against humanity.

Arabo emphasised that the militant had been conducting the most "horrendous, the most heartbreaking things" that people can think of.

He went about telling that 95 per cent of Christians in Mosul were coerced to leave and the other 5 per cent decided to convert to Islam.

The ISIS militants penned a letter addressed to Christians giving them three choices - convert, pay a fine or die. Other Christians chose to pay the fine, however, the militants did not honour their words.

"The letter that they sent out with those three items (convert, pay a fine or die), they did ask to pay a fine but actually after they pay a fine, they (ISIS militants) are actually taking over their wives and their daughters and making them into their wives. So really it's convert or die, face death by the sword," Arabo said.

Arabo shared that militants were putting red stamp on the house of Christian families fleeing the region. The red stamp denotes that the militants will kill the family if they come back.

"... this is a Christian holocaust within our midst and the world community cannot turn a blind eye," Arabo appealed to the world.

"This is a genocide in every sense of the word. They want everyone to convert and they want Sharia law to be the law of the land," Arabo said wanting for his call to reach every people of every nation.

Read also: Genocide of Christians Happening, Family Shot in the Faces in Refusal to Convert

Meanwhile, the Australian government is advising all Australians against travelling to Iraq.

"We now advise Australians not to travel to Iraqi Kurdistan - the provinces of Dahuk, Erbil and Sulaymaniyah - following clashes between armed opposition groups and Peshmerga forces. Australians should depart while commercial options are available. You should also avoid travel south of Erbil and on roads between Erbil and Dohuk."

The government is highlighting that the security situation in Iraq has deteriorated significantly. According to government information, extremists are now active in many parts of Iraq, including in Iraqi Kurdistan and the situation could persist without warning.

The Australian Embassy in Baghdad is already being kept at a minimum. In as much as the government is retaining diplomatic presence in Baghdad, the embassy remained close to the public until the present situation eases.

"Consular assistance is no longer available within Iraq," the government said.

For those who were already in Iraq, Baghdad International Airport and Erbil International Airport remain open and most commercial airlines continue to operate. However, flights departing Erbil are heavily booked. Australians are strongly advised to make arrangements to depart immediately.

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(Photo: REUTERS/Ari Jala / REUTERS/Ari Jala)
Displaced families from the minority Yazidi sect, fleeing the violence in the Iraqi town of Sinjarl west of Mosul, arrive at Dohuk province, August 4, 2014. Iraq's Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki ordered his air force for the first time to back Kurdish forces against Islamic State fighters after the Sunni militants made another dramatic push through the north, state television reported on Monday.
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