Northern Japan Hit by 6.1-Magnitude Earthquake, No Major Damage, No Tsunami Warning Issued

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By Esther Tanquintic-Misa | August 11, 2014 3:43 PM EST

The coast of northern Japan has been stricken by a 6.0-magnitude earthquake on Sunday afternoon. No major damage was reported, as well as no tsunami warning was raised.

Reuters/Municipal fire departm
A damaged house is pictured in the San Marcos region, in the northwest of Guatemala, in this July 7, 2014 handout picture by Guatemala's municipal fire department. A strong earthquake shook the Guatemalan border with Mexico on Monday, killing at least four people, damaging dozens of buildings and triggering landslides. The 6.9 magnitude quake struck near the frontier, and much of the damage was reported in the Guatemalan border region of San Marcos, where it downed power lines, opened cracks in buildings and triggered landslides which blocked roads. REUTERS/Municipal fire department/Handout via Reuters

The temblor's epicentre was located 81 kilometres (50 miles) east of Mutsu, a city located on the Shimokita Peninsula in the northeastern region of Tōhoku. It had a depth of 50 kilometres (31 miles), according to the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA).

The shallow quake struck at 12:43 p.m. local time (0343 GMT).

Seismologists and Japanese officials said the temblor only briefly disrupted transportation in the region, such as East Japan Railway Co's train services between Ninohe Station and Shin-Aomori Station on the Tohoku Shinkansen Line.

Tohoku Electric Power Co said it did not see irregularities in the operations of the Higashidori nuclear power plant. Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd likewise reported zero damage and normal operations at its spent fuel reprocessing plant in the village of Rokkasho.

Japan is located atop several tectonic plates, which yields off number of relatively violent quakes annually for the country.

This reality therefore made it government that private companies as well as individuals adhere to strict building codes so as to minimise potential havoc in cases powerful earthquakes strike.

The last time a strong 6.0-magnitude earthquake struck the country was in May. It shook buildings in Tokyo, the Japanese capital. At least 17 people were injured.

The most recent magnanimous temblor that struck Japan was the 9.0-magnitude quake in March 2011 that triggered off a tsunami.

The tsunami lashed out and crippled the Fukushima nuclear power plant, operated by Tokyo Electric Power Company.

Read: Fukushima's Tepco to Fail Deadline of Clearing Radioactive Water - Report

TEPCO is currently racing to finish the clearing out of radioactive water around the facility, based on a commitment it gave to Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in 2013. It vowed to finish filtering the isotope strontium out of stored water by March 31, 2015.

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(Photo: Reuters/Municipal fire departm / )
A damaged house is pictured in the San Marcos region, in the northwest of Guatemala, in this July 7, 2014 handout picture by Guatemala's municipal fire department. A strong earthquake shook the Guatemalan border with Mexico on Monday, killing at least four people, damaging dozens of buildings and triggering landslides. The 6.9 magnitude quake struck near the frontier, and much of the damage was reported in the Guatemalan border region of San Marcos, where it downed power lines, opened cracks in buildings and triggered landslides which blocked roads. REUTERS/Municipal fire department/Handout via Reuters
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