5 Snacks Only Australians may Have Thought Of

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By Vanessa Doctor | August 1, 2014 4:50 PM EST

Some countries are extremely popular for coming up with the craziest types of snacks. Australians also have their share of the lot, with recipes passed on from one generation to the next and some even going as far as setting up shop to serve the popular dish.

Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
Nutritionists warn that people in the Pacific are at risk of obesity on a Western diet

Here are some tasty treats that may only have come from the Land Down Under.

1. Potato cakes

These are the Australian version of chips or French fries. Potato cakes are made by making big circles from mashed potatoes. The cakes have a diameter as big as the diner's hand and are often one-inch thick. These are deep-fried and served with deep-fried fish or even hamburgers. Salt or ketchup are added as you please.

2. Burger rings

These are burger-flavored snack rings that come in a bag. The rings are eaten straight from the bag by hand and can conveniently fit in each finger. Many individuals outside Australia actually do not like the taste of burger rings, with some even describing that these tastes like semen.

3. The lot

"The lot" is the more popular name of the Australian hamburger. People Down Under named it such because of the several condiments or "lot" added to the burger and bun. Some of the things you may find in your hamburger include bacon, cheese, lettuce, onions, ketchup, mayonnaise, mustard, pickles and ketchup. The more interesting ingredients may feature pineapple, egg, beets and fried mashed potato.

4. Dagwood dog

Another name for the snack is the Pluto Pup. It is the Australian version of the corndog. The food is prepared by cooking a hotdog on a stick then dipping it in batter then deep-frying for a few minutes. The dagwood dog is dipped in tomato sauce before eating.

5. Pie floater

It will take time for foreigners to get used to pie floaters. It was named such because a traditional meat pie is placed sitting or submerged in a bowl of thick green pea soup. Other ingredients that may be added include mint sauce, tomato sauce, pepper and malt vinegar. 

Many of these Australian snacks are sold at food carts in fairs and markets, so tourists should pen them into their itineraries as food-binge must-haves. The versions may differ depending on which part of the country you are ordering.  

(Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson / )
Nutritionists warn that people in the Pacific are at risk of obesity on a Western diet
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