Julia Gillard Admits to a Controversial Deed

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By Athena Yenko | July 30, 2014 10:02 AM EST

On Tuesday, the first woman prime minister of Australia, Julia Gillard, admitted to a controversial deed that put former climate change minister's memoirs, The Fights of My Life, in the headlines before its official launch.

 During the promotion of Greg Combet's book, he revealed that he had turn down an offer from Gillard to take over as Labor leader and eventually run for prime minister. This revelation became controversial that his book made it to the news before its official launching on Tuesday.

During the launch of Combet's book, Gillard admitted that, indeed, he asked for Combet to head the party in June 2013 as it became clear to her that her leadership "was very likely to come to an early end".

Speaking during the book launch, Gillard confessed that as early as June of 2013, she knew that her leadership will not last until the September election.

"There came a time when it was clear to me that my leadership was very likely to come to an early end. My belief that the nation and my political party should be led by a person of good values and a clear sense of purpose remains strong...my view was that the best person at that time was Greg Combet," Gillard said.

She said that she wanted to see Combet turn a page to his life as a Labor leader, but that it was not just meant to be.

She however acknowledged that even if it was Combet whom she offered the position, Bill Shorten, as the Labor leader at present is "taking his remarkable talents and fierce passion into the fight for fairness and a better future."

Combet's memoir is co-written by journalist Mark Davis. It dwells with Combet's time as head of the ACTU and his years in the parliament.

In the memoir, Combet divulged his yearning to retire from the parliament that coincided with Gillard's offer. He said that he was battling a cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis at the time of the offer and the amount of physical pain suffering added up to the distress of working through Labor's second term.

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