Malaysia Airlines Flights: MH17 Black Box Data Suggests Missile Attack; MH17 and MH370 Leads Malaysia Airlines to ‘Renaming and Rebranding’

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By jaskiran kaur | July 28, 2014 6:08 PM EST

Data from black box of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 has been recovered. The information from the flight data recorder suggests the Malaysia Airlines flight was hit by a missile before crashing. Also, the loss of MH17 and MH370 has led Malaysia Airlines to consider "renaming and rebranding."  

REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin
A man walks past wreckage at the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 near the village of Hrabove (Grabovo), Donetsk region July 26, 2014. Nearly 300 people, 193 of them Dutch citizens, were killed when the Malaysia Airlines plane en route from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur was brought down in eastern Ukraine, where separatists are battling government forces, on July 17.

CBS reports that investigators recovered black box of MH17 from the "wreckage" and its "unreleased data" shows information that is "consistent with the plane's fuselage being hit multiple times by shrapnel from a missile explosion."

According to the official there is a "massive explosion decompression."

"It did what it was designed to do," a European air safety official told the news network. As per the official it was designed to "bring down airplanes."

The report notes that the dispute has led to the difficulties in carrying out proper investigation at the wreckage site. However, Dutch, Malaysian and Australian investigators are working towards solving the mystery of what actually happened to Malaysia Airlines flight MH17.

MH17 crashed on July 17, 2014 around 50 minutes after it took off from Amsterdam to reach Kuala Lumpur. Boeing 777 was carrying 298 people (283 passengers and 15 crew members). It is said the airline lost contact when it reached near area called Hrabove in Donetsk Oblast, Ukraine. The plane is believed to be shot down by Buk missile by pro-Russia separatists rebels. However, Russia refuses to take the responsibility and also refuses to accept supplying weapons to the rebels.

At the same time, Russia has devised several theories explaining what could have happened to Malaysia Airlines flight MH17. This includes theories such as attempt to assassinate Vladimir Putin and CIA and Ukraine collaboration for shot down.

MH17 crashed four months after the disappearance of Malaysian Airlines flight MH370. The world is still reeling from the tragic, mysterious disappearance of the plane that was carrying 227 passengers from Beijing to Kuala Lumpur when it lost contact with the radar. MH17 and MH370 tragedies have put Malaysia Airlines in a questionable place.

Following MH17 crash and MH370 disappearance, Malaysia Airlines is planning to introduce some changes. According to The Sunday Telegraph (via The Telegraph UK), the airlines that is majorly owned by the Malaysian government, is considering "restructuring airline's routes and expand outsourcing to increase profitability." Malaysia Airlines' director Hugh Dunleavy promises that despite the tragedies that occurred recently causing massive loss, the airlines "would eventually 'emerge stronger.'"

Some other changes that Malaysia Airlines is looking at introducing following the MH17 and MH370 tragedies include "renaming and rebranding the airline." MH17 crashed after the missile attack. Its wreckage was discovered soon after the news emerged. However, MH370 continues to remain a mystery. Even after four months of the plane's disappearance, wreckage or exact cause of its disappearance hasn't been found.  

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(Photo: REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin / )
A man walks past wreckage at the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 near the village of Hrabove (Grabovo), Donetsk region July 26, 2014. Nearly 300 people, 193 of them Dutch citizens, were killed when the Malaysia Airlines plane en route from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur was brought down in eastern Ukraine, where separatists are battling government forces, on July 17.
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