Samsung Galaxy Alpha/S5 Prime/Galaxy F Metal Design May be Limited; Galaxy Note 4 Highlights Handwriting, Retina Recognition

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By Gel Galang | July 24, 2014 10:59 AM EST

The Samsung Galaxy Alpha has taken the main stage after it became the other name tagged to the metal-bodied Samsung devices, following the Samsung Galaxy S5 Prime and Galaxy F.

REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won
An employee of Samsung Electronics walks past the company main office in Seoul in this April 6, 2010 file photo. Samsung Electronics Co Ltd is emerging as a major player in its local debt market, buying more South Korean-issued bonds as it juggles a $60 billion cash pile. Samsung's push into private bank debt and government bonds underscores the challenges faced by the electronics giant in managing its massive cash holdings, with local banks reluctant to overload on short-term deposits from Samsung.

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This time, however, the updates about the Samsung Galaxy Alpha/S5 Prime/Galaxy F metal phones is less positive, since a report has revealed that a metal body for the Samsung Galaxy Alpha may not come in continuous supplies.

SamMobile reports that manufacturers that are not under Apple are not able to produce more than a million phones with metal bodies per month. So far, Korea does not have metal case producers, and those mentioned with a-million-a-month manufacturers are actually Chinese firms.

Considering Samsung's timelines as well as other rumoured plans for phones to be released, there is now talk that the Samsung Galaxy Alpha/S5 Prime/ Galaxy F will be limited to a specific market or will be a limited edition device.

This can certainly add to the premium appeal of the market, but it would also be interesting to see how the audience will react to the limited release of the device.

Samsung Galaxy Note 4: More Highlights for Features

The Samsung Galaxy Note 4 has also been privy to a string of rumours and spotted highlights for the upcoming device. But among the new ones include the possible inclusion of handwriting recognition into the mix.

Digital Trends has rounded up some of the newer bits of information from Samsung and has spotted a Samsung patent that pushes for a more improved handwriting recognition component of the device.

According to the report, this new feature can tap into the territory of better security, so that instead of relying on PIN codes, a signature on the lock screen can open your code. There is some advantage here in that it would be harder to fake a signature, but there's also something to be considered about signatures not being the same even for one person at different times.

In any case, this feature has also been explored for commands. Suggestions for this feature include writing a specific name on the lock screen to automatically have the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 dial the number.

In the past, there has also been talk of a retina scanner docking in the Samsung Galaxy Note 4. Phone Arena has spotted a tweet from Samsung Exynos before, which had the photo of an eye imposed with what appears to be a scanner, both of which are on top of a device that has very slim bezels.

With many renders and live photos of the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 having very slim bezels, it's not easy to imagine this device being the Galaxy Note. So far, what has been hinted for the retina scanner includes paying bills, be used at a supermarket, for mobile communication fees, and even the security for unlocking phones.

Samsung Galaxy Note 2's stylus (via YouTube/Intellect Digest)

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(Photo: REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won / )
An employee of Samsung Electronics walks past the company main office in Seoul in this April 6, 2010 file photo. Samsung Electronics Co Ltd is emerging as a major player in its local debt market, buying more South Korean-issued bonds as it juggles a $60 billion cash pile. Samsung's push into private bank debt and government bonds underscores the challenges faced by the electronics giant in managing its massive cash holdings, with local banks reluctant to overload on short-term deposits from Samsung.
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