Research Says People Who Drink Frequently Have a Higher Social Status

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By Sarah Thomas | July 21, 2014 12:01 PM EST

While alcohol increases the risk of heart diseases, blood pressure, liver damage, brain damage, sexual problems and the list goes on, Canadian researchers found heavy drinking could increase your social standing as well, and this was especially true in the case of men. For women, however, the amount did not matter, the fact that they were drinking itself gave them a higher social status.

Reuters
A nine-year-old British girl has become the youngest person liked to the deadly drinking game called Neknomination that has been spreading rapidly across the world. (Representational Picture: Reuters)

The study, Drinking to Reach the Top was conducted by Dr Tara Dumas, a postdoctoral fellow at Canada's Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. He observed the drinking habits of 357 young adults in Ontario between May and July 2012. He recruited them as a part of the study of bargoers, along with their friends. Participants were questioned on their drinking habits, focusing on how often they over do it, specifying the amount of alcohol they consumed. They were asked if their drinking habits influence their peer's opinions and perceptions about them. They were also analysed on their drinking habits, the number of drinks consumed and their frequency.

"We used field methodology to recruit young adults' natural drinking groups," researchers said.

Dumas explained to the Daily Beast that men who binge drink had a higher peer-nominated status, whereas for women, more drinking in general was related to higher peer-nominated status. The findings also revealed that excessive drinkers were awarded with the highest social status.

"More consumption during heaviest drinking occasion also predicted higher status. Further, for both men and women, drinking more than one's peers during one's heaviest drinking occasion in the past year was also associated with higher status," said Dumas.

The research throws light on the psychological notion of binge drinking being 'cool.' The research seeks to change this pattern by bringing in awareness among the people of the dangers of excessive drinking. Binge drinking kills 88,000 people in the U.S. every year, most of whom are adults who are 26 years and older. "Instead of inspiring young people to drink, we hope that our findings encourage prevention programming that addresses young people's status-related concerns around drinking and teaches them how to be socially integrated while also adopting responsible drinking practices," she says.

Your social status will wither away with your deteriorating health and visits to the rehab, remember never to over indulge.

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(Photo: Reuters / )
A nine-year-old British girl has become the youngest person liked to the deadly drinking game called Neknomination that has been spreading rapidly across the world. (Representational Picture: Reuters)
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