How to Speak Australian: A Quick Guide to Local Slangs

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By Sounak Mukhopadhyay | July 18, 2014 12:21 PM EST

If you are planning to visit Australia for a few days or changing your base to down under, you need to know that there is an Aussie way of everything. There are distinct ways of how an Australian does a particular thing. Moreover, there are certain Australian expressions which you must know to be familiar with the culture. Here are some examples.

REUTERS/Stefano Rellandini
A fan of Australia is pictured during their 2014 World Cup Group B soccer match against the Netherlands at the Beira Rio stadium in Porto Alegre June 18, 2014.

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If an Aussie has asked you to join them to get some "Amber fluid," don't worry. It's not an alien drink. It's beer. Make sure you don't get "off your face (drunk)" too soon. When employees "chuck a sickie" in Australia, it means they applied for a sick leave even though they are perfectly fine. The Aussie expression for an unusually happy person is "grinning like a shot fox," and a "crow eater" means a person who is from South Australia.

"Dead horse" means tomato sauce, "ankle biter" is a small child and "cobber" means a friend. When an Australian gets surprised or excited, he may say "holy dooley!" In Australia, you can eat "mystery bag (sausage)," appreciate "good oil (valuable information)," and it is "London to a brick (absolutely sure)" that you need "Sunnies (sunglasses)" here.

If you are asked to "chuck a yewy" while driving, it means that you have to take a U-turn. When someone asks you to check out "white pointers," it means that there are topless women taking sunbath. A "true blue" Aussie is a patriotic one. When someone says they are "stuffed," it means that they are tired. If you go down under to "make a Quid (earn money)," make sure you don't end up losing your "brass razoo (get very poor)." "Down Under," by the way, means both Australia and New Zealand.

A "piece of piss" is an "easy task." When a shopper gives you a product at "mate's rate," it means you are getting a price cheaper than the usual one because you are considered a friend. A "hottie" in Australia does not mean a sexy lady. It means a bottle of hot water. When you enjoy "Fremantle Doctor," it is the cooling afternoon breeze in Perth that comes from Freeo."

Contact the writer: s.mukhopadhyay@IBTimes.com.au

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(Photo: REUTERS/Stefano Rellandini / )
A fan of Australia is pictured during their 2014 World Cup Group B soccer match against the Netherlands at the Beira Rio stadium in Porto Alegre June 18, 2014.
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