Chinese Businessman Charged For Hacking Boeing And Other US Defense Contractors - Find Ways To Protect Your System

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By Karen Wong | July 14, 2014 2:07 PM EST

The US Department of Justice has charged a Chinese businessman for hacking into Boeing's computer system and stealing information about US military aircraft and weapons this Friday, July 11th.

REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski/Files
File picture illustration of the word 'password' pictured through a magnifying glass on a computer screen, taken in Berlin May 21, 2013. Security experts warn there is little Internet users can do to protect themselves from the recently uncovered "Heartbleed" bug that exposes data to hackers, at least not until vulnerable websites upgrade their software. Researchers have observed April 8, 2014, sophisticated hacking groups conducting automated scans of the Internet in search of Web servers running a widely used Web encryption program known as OpenSSL that makes them vulnerable to the theft of data, including passwords, confidential communications and credit card numbers. OpenSSL is used on about two-thirds of all Web servers, but the issue has gone undetected for about two years. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski/Files

Mr. Su Bin, the said businessman, has been stealing data from the US between 2009 and 2013. He has been working with two unidentified contacts from China and attempting to sell information to Chinese companies there, according to the criminal complaint.

Su Bin the owner of Lode Tech, a Chinese aviation company that has offices in Canada, was arrested on June 28 for stealing 65 GB worth of sensitive information regarding fighter jets and Boeing's C-17 military cargo aircraft program, according to the Canadian Department of Justice. However, it wasn't stated whether the Chinese government have ordered the attack or whether they have accessed classified systems or classified information.

He is charged with unauthorized computer access but court documents did not say how they hacked Boeing's computers. F.B.I. agent Noel A. Neeman describes the general strategy on how hackers compromise email or social media accounts by sending an email with a malicious piece of code. By clicking the link, you are now giving hackers access to your computer systems.

"We remain deeply concerned about cyber-enabled theft of sensitive information and we have repeatedly made it clear that the United States will continue using all the tools our government possesses to strengthen cyber security and confront cybercrime," said Marc Raimondi, a Justice Department spokesman, as reported by The New York Times.

This assault of one of US' most sophisticated military contractors just shows that even the safest computer systems are vulnerable to hackers.

The FBI Federal Bureau of Investigation stated ways on how to protect your computer.

1. Keep your firewall turned on

2. Install or update your antivirus software

3. Install or update your antispyware technology

4. Keep your operating system up to date

5.  Be careful on what you download

6.  Turn off your computer

Spam and unfamiliar links are other ways for someone to infiltrate your computer. Make sure that the links sent to you are safe before clicking. This will prevent hackers from getting into your system.

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(Photo: REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski/Files / )
File picture illustration of the word 'password' pictured through a magnifying glass on a computer screen, taken in Berlin May 21, 2013. Security experts warn there is little Internet users can do to protect themselves from the recently uncovered "Heartbleed" bug that exposes data to hackers, at least not until vulnerable websites upgrade their software. Researchers have observed April 8, 2014, sophisticated hacking groups conducting automated scans of the Internet in search of Web servers running a widely used Web encryption program known as OpenSSL that makes them vulnerable to the theft of data, including passwords, confidential communications and credit card numbers. OpenSSL is used on about two-thirds of all Web servers, but the issue has gone undetected for about two years. REUTERS/Pawel Kopczynski/Files
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