World Cup 2014: Singapore Anti-Gambling Ad Hints of Germany Win (VIDEOS)

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By Vittorio Hernandez | July 14, 2014 9:01 AM EST

A boy walks past a World Cup anti-gambling advertisement at a taxi stand in Singapore July 9, 2014. Singapore has scored an own goal with the World Cup anti-gambling ad which features a crestfallen boy telling his friends his dad bet his life savings on Germany - who have just reached the finals by thrashing host nation Brazil 7-1. REUTERS/Edgar Su (SINGAPORE - Tags: SOCIETY MEDIA SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP)
A boy walks past a World Cup anti-gambling advertisement at a taxi stand in Singapore July 9, 2014. Singapore has scored an own goal with the World Cup anti-gambling ad which features a crestfallen boy telling his friends his dad bet his life savings on Germany - who have just reached the finals by thrashing host nation Brazil 7-1. REUTERS/Edgar Su (SINGAPORE - Tags: SOCIETY MEDIA SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP)

An anti-gambling advertisement in Singapore appears to have correctly predicted the outcome of the Wednesday, July 9, game between Germany and Brazil which  ended with the score of 7-1 as well as the finals on Sunday between Germany and Argentina with the score of 1-0. The advertising campaign covers both video and posters.

YouTube/NCPG

The video ran for 34 seconds and featured a bunch of Singaporean boys talking about the World Cup tournament, with one saying, "I hope Germany wins. My dad bet all my savings on them. The poster version showed only two boys with the same kid expressing his anti-gambling sentiment via a thought balloon. The video was posted a month ago and had since got almost 800,000 hits.

The National Council on Problem Gambling commented that the advert was timed with the excitement and hype generated by the World Cup tournament in Brazil as spectators speculate who would win in matches by betting on their favourite teams.

The spokesman of the council explained, "Selecting Germany injected a sense of realism in our messaging, since no one will bet on a potentially losing team ... At the end of the day, win or lose, the dangers of problem gambling and the potential anxiety and pain that loved ones go through, remain unchanged."

YouTube/ESPN

However, because of the "prophetic" nature of the ad, Singaporean Manpower Minister Tan Chuan-Jin commented via a Facebook feed, "Looks like the boy's father who bet all his savings on Germany will be laughing all the way to the bank!"

Minister for Trade and Industry Teo Ser Luck added, "Germany beat Brazil 7-1! Brazil need to find out what went wrong and I need to find the script-writer for the gambling control advertisement."

Among the witty comments on the YouTube video was from DavidUngerMusic who wrote, "After today's game, I think that I should start gambling."

Mist8k commented, "I wish I could laugh at this but knowing a few gambling addicts myself I know his dad would just blow all his money he won (even if it was millions) and then probably end up getting shot by a drug dealer."

A British chap also won big when he correctly bet on the 7-1 score.

Read:

World Cup 2014: Nelly the Elephant Is the Better FIFA Oracle Than Big Head the Turtle, But the Real Victor is Essex Punter Who Won £2,505 on £5 Bet

World Cup 2014: Microsoft's AI Digital Assistant Cortana Predicts Final Match Will Be Between Germany & Argentina

World Cup 2014: Chinese Search Engine Baidu Joins World Cup Prediction Fever, Claims 100% Accuracy; Predicts Germany Win Over Argentina

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(Photo: / )
A boy walks past a World Cup anti-gambling advertisement at a taxi stand in Singapore July 9, 2014. Singapore has scored an own goal with the World Cup anti-gambling ad which features a crestfallen boy telling his friends his dad bet his life savings on Germany - who have just reached the finals by thrashing host nation Brazil 7-1. REUTERS/Edgar Su (SINGAPORE - Tags: SOCIETY MEDIA SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP)
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