Shutting Down the Bullies: Tips from the Story of Carleigh O’Connell

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July 10, 2014 12:14 PM EST

Bullying is a growing problem among teenagers. Victims of bullying may suffer from depression and physical injuries affecting the student's social development.

Sometimes bullying can make a person strong like the story of 14-year-old Carleigh O'Connell who turns "hurtful" graffiti into an empowering message. Although it may be very difficult to address bullying, here are some things that can reduce bullying in school:

trix0r/Flickr
Being bullied at the school can leave a greater impact on the child than originally thought, latest research out on Monday, says.

1. Clearly define bullying. The school should have a common definition of bullying.

2. Address behaviors. Teachers and staff should look at the specific behaviors, there may be a reason the child is acting this way. The parents should be involved when the behavior keeps occurring.

3. Assess the extent of the problem. Find out how much and what type of bullying is going to target the prevention.

4. Conduct bullying prevention campaigns. It may be through creative art contests which highlight school values, all-school assemblies and communications campaigns.

5. Be trained to handle bullying situations. Hold one-day training sessions, staff meetings and teaching through modeling preferred behaviors to train all school staff on what bullying is, school's policies and rules and the enforcement of the rules.

(Photo: trix0r/Flickr / )
Being bullied at the school can leave a greater impact on the child than originally thought, latest research out on Monday, says.
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