Android Bug Interrupts Phone Calls

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By Naveena Joy | July 10, 2014 10:18 AM EST

A new Android bug has been found interrupting current calls as a result of "something malevolent."

Consumers experience dropped calls and disruptions during their calls. This is because a bug in most of the Android devices are allowing apps to let hackers initiate unauthorized calls, send text messages and execute special codes that instigate other negative actions.

Although the bug has been fixed in the latest Android version 4.4.4 released on June 19, but the flaw affected devices that are running the older version of Jelly Bean (4.1 - 4.3) and KitKat (4.4) of the operating system and also Android 4.1.1 through 4.4.3, which are not yet updated.

The Google statistics conducted in July 2014 showed around 75 percent of the Android users have devices that are running the older versions of Jelly Bean and KitKat. But there was a problem.

The flaw was found and Google was notified late last year by researchers of CureSec, a Berlin-based security company. The search giant released the new version of Android 4.4.4 after fixing the bug.

It was discovered the bug could be exploited through a rogue application included in Android phones. As the bug was already present, the app doesn't need to officially take permission to access the affected device to interrupt or make calls.

Currently, the only devices that receive Android updates directly from Google are Mototrola's Moto E, Moto G and Moto X. The Nexus line of phones and tablets and Google Play-edition phones and also some Sony phones have received the 4.4.4 update.

According to iTWire, "One of the biggest criticisms of Google's Android as an operating system is that due to the number of different devices it supports the various devices don't all receive the latest software updates at the same time."

To avoid such actions, CureSec has developed an Android application which is available on the Web Site. The application will be checking whether the user's phone is exposed to this bug.

Also, the TomsGuide suggested the phones can be kept secure by not installing any unauthorized or problematic apps in the device and also to ensure the "unknown sources" is unchecked in the device security settings.

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