Being a Good Manager and Retaining Your Employees

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July 10, 2014 9:56 AM EST

No one wants to be tagged as a bad boss. Some simply lack the proper training to effectively manage people. A boss should master how to connect to the employees in an organization.

"People leave managers not companies...in the end, turnover is mostly a manager issue," Gallup, a research-based consulting company, wrote in its survey findings.

The effect of poor management is widely felt. Gallup noted poorly managed work groups are on average 50 percent less productive and 44 percent less profitable than well-managed groups.

Below are suggested guidelines to develop trust from your employees and become the best manager that you can be:

1.  Set clear expectations. A good leader set priorities and discuss them with employees in a formal planning session or informal conversation.

2.  Recognize efforts. Nothing works like positive reinforcement and a great leader should be very aware of this. Mary Kay Ash, the founder of Mary Kay cosmetics, once said about appreciation, "Everyone wants to be appreciated, so if you appreciate someone, don't keep it to yourself."

3.  Gives feedback. A good boss provides real-time feedback on the job performance of employees to establish a coach-player relationship reflecting a sense of leadership, conversation and cooperation.

4.  Be a leader. Being the boss does not necessarily mean you are leading. A leader can be a boss but not every boss is a leader. Encourage, inspire performance and listen to employees. Motivate the team and lead direction toward achieving a goal.

5.  Be trustworthy. Managers earn the trust of employees based on their behaviors toward others, positive personal attitudes, and beliefs. Employees trust their managers who are reliable, genuine and whom they can have openness and transparency.

6.  Build your team. The people should work as a team to succeed at work and accomplish the group's objective. Acknowledge every one as part of the team and reinforced by posting team's news on the bulletin board, holding team meetings and track team performances.

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