MP Wants Naked Image of Apollo on Russian Paper Money Removed Because It Shows the Greek God’s Genital

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By Vittorio Hernandez | July 10, 2014 8:42 AM EST

A picture illustration of a section of a Russian 100-rouble banknote taken in Moscow, July 8, 2014. Naked images of the Greek God Apollo have graced buildings and paintings for centuries, but his disrobed body has so shocked one Russian lawmaker that he wants to change the country's 100-rouble banknote. The note, worth less than $3, depicts an image of a statue of Apollo riding a four-horse chariot atop the Bolshoi Theatre, one of Russia's main cultural symbols. REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin (RUSSIA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY)
A picture illustration of a section of a Russian 100-rouble banknote taken in Moscow, July 8, 2014. Naked images of the Greek God Apollo have graced buildings and paintings for centuries, but his disrobed body has so shocked one Russian lawmaker that he wants to change the country's 100-rouble banknote. The note, worth less than $3, depicts an image of a statue of Apollo riding a four-horse chariot atop the Bolshoi Theatre, one of Russia's main cultural symbols. REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin (RUSSIA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY)

A legislator from Russia seems to want to equate being Russian to being a prude. Roman Khudyakov of the LDPR party proposed on Wednesday that the country's 100 rouble money paper which depicts the naked images of the Greek god Apollo be removed.

"You can see clearly that Apollo is naked, you can see his genitalia," the MP explained to Reuters Television.

It is the same Apollo statue found in buildings, paintings and literary works wherein the mythical god is riding a chariot drawn by four horses. To give the image a Russian flavour, the background was the Bolshoi Theater, a Russian landmark.

Khudyakov said he submitted a parliamentary request and gave it directly to the head of Russia's central bank. He said the money must be in line with Russian law that protects children. His proposal is to replace it with the image of Sevastopol, a Crimean city known as both a hero city and "a city of strategic importance."

He recalled that what prompted his to action was seeing two children who were examining the banknote when the girl shrieked to the boy that she saw a penis on the money.

His request, though, may have chances of being acted upon because of the renewed conservatism in Russia being pushed by its president, Vladimir Putin. As a result of this conservatism, when the Bolshoi Theater reopened in 2011, it covered the loins of the Apollo statue with a fig leaf.

The same country has recently banned the manufacture and sale of synthetic lace panties.

The proposal, however, became the butt of jokes in the Internet that probably it was the first time for the MP to see a 100 rouble banknote since Russian currency is known for much larger denominations. The note is worth about £2.

But Irina Rapoport, a professor at the Russian Academy for Medical Science, opposed the move, telling Russian daily Izvestia, "To me, nothing awful will happen  if a girl sees the image of Apollo on the banknote.

Had Kudyakov been born Greek, he probably would have a heyday filing bills that would seek more proper cover for thousand of naked images of Greeks gods and goddesses spread all over the Hellenic nation.

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A picture illustration of a section of a Russian 100-rouble banknote taken in Moscow, July 8, 2014. Naked images of the Greek God Apollo have graced buildings and paintings for centuries, but his disrobed body has so shocked one Russian lawmaker that he wants to change the country's 100-rouble banknote. The note, worth less than $3, depicts an image of a statue of Apollo riding a four-horse chariot atop the Bolshoi Theatre, one of Russia's main cultural symbols. REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin (RUSSIA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY)
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