Tyra Banks Talks What it Means to be Beautiful In the Future, Cites Self and Rihanna as Best Examples

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By Annie Dee | July 9, 2014 10:26 AM EST

Tyra Banks talks future beauty. And not everyone buys it.

Fierce. That's what the model, creator and executive producer of "America's Next Top Model" describes women who know their value, no matter how different their beauty is. More than 20 cycles of the model search reality show and she has become a beauty guru. In fact, she now says she envisions a world one day where every girl is fierce and the standards of beauty? Just like hers.

REUTERS/PHIL MCCARTEN
Actress/model Tyra Banks arrives at the 35th Annual Daytime Emmy Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood, California June 20, 2008.

In a piece she wrote for Wall Street Journal, Tyra Banks thinks beauty in the future will mean being different and not looking just like everyone else. Interestingly, she also thinks plastic surgery and other aids will be widespread and accessible to everyone so that distinctive looks will be easier to achieve.

She wrote, "As I look into the future, I see radical changes in both how people "attain beauty," and how the world perceives beauty. In general, I believe, traditional beauty will be less valuable-and more uniqueness will be heralded."

The fashion and beauty guru made several predictions on what beauty means and how it could be attained in the future. She believes the world will be kinder to those with unique looks, if not totally be appreciative of these looks. Cookie-butter looks are out, cutting edge faces and styles in. She said, "people will be vying for that cutting-edge, distinct look in the way that today celebs reach for baby names that defy convention."

And by being distinctive, she means looking like her. She thinks her face, her beauty standards, and her skin for the matter will the face, standards and skin of the future. "Typical features and coloring will lean toward a Rihanna or Beyoncé or me kind of look. People with alabaster or ebony skin will be rare and heralded for that uniqueness."

In addition to this "me, me and me!" assertion, she also predicts that the future world will be a world without natural food, hair extensions and feminism! Before feminists and environmentalists complain however, Tyra tried to support her statements with some relevant points.

No hair extensions will be nonexistent because a hair serum will be created that can lengthen and thicken hair as fast as 24 hours. Natural food will be scarce and only be accessible to rich people because of global warming. Therefore, only rich people will attain that healthy glow and healthy shape. Lastly, feminism will be irrelevant because feminists will sooner than later, already triumph. "Women, in control of when they can have children (up to age 120!), and having more degrees and education than men, will be in charge."

Naturally, Tyra Banks receives backlash over this piece. Forbes claims it's "ridiculous," especially the one about feminism not being relevant anymore.

"It's tough to read a statement that simultaneously predicts a future where feminism is an outdated concept and also reinforces such basic gender stereotyping. It would be great if women had more control over their rights and their bodies and global access to education," Forbes magazine claims.

At least Tyra Banks stayed true to her style and brand, something she asks her model contestants do all the time. Look at how she ends up talking about herself, too. Something she keeps doing on her show when giving out comments as well. Forbes commented, "It reads like a Kurt Vonnegut novel - at times absurd, at times terrifying, wholly self-referential, and never out of character - if Vonnegut had been a super model with a one-track mind, of course."

According to Time, "the struggle for uniqueness in a gentrified world and class warfare come directly from bad dystopian novels."

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(Photo: REUTERS/PHIL MCCARTEN / )
Actress/model Tyra Banks arrives at the 35th Annual Daytime Emmy Awards at the Kodak theatre in Hollywood, California June 20, 2008.
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