Latest Samsung 'Wall Huggers' Ad Ridicules iPhone's Poor Battery Life

  • Rate this Story
  • 0
  • 0

By Sovan Mandal | July 7, 2014 2:53 PM EST

Samsung is on the offensive again against Apple, this time, needling it with another ad campaign titled "Wall Huggers." The ad ridicules the iPhone for its inferior battery life, something that ensures iPhone owners to be the ones that are most likely to be found hanging around charging outlets. Be it airport lounges, railway stations or even wash rooms, all charging ports seem to have already been taken over by iPhone users desperate to put in some juice into their devices.

In contrast, users of the latest Samsung Galaxy S5 are being shown to be at the opposite spectrum of charging woes. The ad also shows a man swapping the battery of his new Galaxy S5, much to the envy of an iPhone user who is tied to a charging outlet ruing at the fact that the iPhone comes with an unchangeable battery.

The ad also harps on the ultra power-saving mode inherent in the new Galaxy S5. The ad shows a woman checking the battery status on her Galaxy S5 which reveals a full day of usage left even with just 10 per cent of battery remaining. The ultra power-saving mode gets activated when battery level drops dangerously low and kicks off a host of actions all aimed at conserving power.

MacRumor enumerates what the Galaxy S5 does when it enters ultra power-saving mode. For instance, the display turns black and white, and connectivity gets downgraded to 3G in power-saving mode. Apart from LTE, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi too is turned off. The phone's functionality, too, gets confined to just the basics, which includes making and receiving calls, access to emails and surfing the Web. App access gets limited to just the absolute essentials to save power as well.

In contrast, Apple lacks such a power-saving mechanism, though iOS 8 is believed to include a feature that will allow users to know which apps are draining the battery the most. Meanwhile, Apple is expected to launch two new iPhone 6 variants with screen sizes of 4.7 and 5.5 inches. Some consumers have already voiced their expectations that while they do yearn for a bigger iPhone, they'd also like the battery to perform significantly better.

(Credit: YouTube/Samsung Mobile USA)

To contact the editor, e-mail:

  • Rate this Story
  • 0
  • 0
This article is copyrighted by IBTimes.com.au, the business news leader

Join the Conversation

IBTimes TV
E-Newsletters

We value your privacy. Your email address will not be shared.