Fourth of July Guide On Do's and Don'ts On Firework Sounds For Your Dogs

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By Tanya Diente | July 3, 2014 12:32 PM EST

While people enjoy the sound of fireworks during Fourth of July, dogs however cower in fright and seek shelter from the sound. Dogs can hear noises better than humans and the sound of fireworks is no excuse to their sensitive ears. Thus, it's important to know some tips on how to ensure their safety from the sound of fireworks.

REUTERS
Chloe, a nine-year-old Yorkshire Terrier, looks into the camera after tasting a dog treat sample at Milo's Kitchen Treat Truck in San Francisco, California June 27, 2014. Milo's Kitchen, a San Francisco-based pet food company, on Friday started its nationwide food truck tour specifically catered to dogs.

Below are some Fourth of July do's and don'ts from Tahoedailytribune and Dogchannel on firework sounds for your dogs.

Do

1) Put an I.D. collar or tag to your dogs. Permanent tattoo or microchip also works in case the dog runs away from home out of fear from the sound.

2) Create a "quiet place" for the dog. For crate-trained dogs, a crate with a cover would help. If not, then find the quietest room in the house and set up the dog with food, water and blanket.

3) Have "white noise" available. This could be from a fan, radio and/or TV running to help cover up the sound of fireworks.

4) According to Lorraine Corriveau, a wellness veterinarian at Purdue University's School of Veterinary Medicine, owners can use a simple trick of putting cotton to their dog's ears to "muffle the sound."

5) Feed and potty the dogs prior to the festivities as they may not eat or go to the bathroom later when they are stressed out by the sounds.

6) Discuss medications with the vet that can help ease a stressed out dog. Some dogs need a sedative to pull through a night of fireworks.

7) Seek the assistance of a dog trainer on how to properly pacify the dog from the sound of fireworks.

Don't

1) Take the dog out to watch the fireworks. Not only is it scary it can also damage their sensitive ears.

2) Leave the dog outside unattended. A frightened dog always finds a way to find a safe shelter, away from the noise even if it means away from home.

3) Expose a puppy to the sound of loud fireworks thinking they will just get used to it. It will only be a bad experience and they will hate it for the rest of their life.

4) Force your dog to stay. Remove a visibly stressed dog away from the situation immediately.

5) Expect your dog to join the gathering of a bunch of people and firework noises. Instead, plan on giving the dog breaks during the night so they can relax.


Source:YouTube/Robert Brandau

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(Photo: REUTERS / Stephen Lam)
Chloe, a nine-year-old Yorkshire Terrier, looks into the camera after tasting a dog treat sample at Milo's Kitchen Treat Truck in San Francisco, California June 27, 2014. Milo's Kitchen, a San Francisco-based pet food company, on Friday started its nationwide food truck tour specifically catered to dogs.
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