More Australians Now Favour Carbon Tax

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By Vittorio Hernandez | June 23, 2014 8:46 AM EST

In another hit on the embattled Abbott government, the latest survey by the Climate Institute found that only 30 per cent of Australians now are against the carbon law of the Gillard administration. That is a big decline from the 52 per cent in 2012, The Sydney Morning Herald reports.

On the other hand, the percentage of Aussies who back the carbon tax went up by 6 per cent to 34 per cent. They survey was based on responses of 1,100 people online in May, which also found that only 22 per cent support the Coalition's replacement for the carbon tax, the Direct Action scheme.

That comes at a time that the Coalition just hurdled over the weekend the opposition in the Senate on its proposed federal budget. 

Likewise, reflecting the decreased support for the Abbott government as a result of its proposed budget is the survey response that only 20 per cent believe in Prime Minister Tony Abbott when it comes to climate change, while 31 per cent believed in Opposition leader Bill Shorten when it comes to his approach to climate change.

Besides releasing the survey, the Climate Institute also brought a pair of life-size dinosaurs to Parliament in a last attempt to save the carbon tax, which Mr Abbott have vowed to repeal since his Opposition days.

"There are dinosaurs in politics and business who want to hold back progress, who actually want to take us back to when big polluters could pollute for free," Sky News quoted John Connor, chief executive of Climate Change.

He said the dinosaurs are a last appeal to Parliament not to repeal the carbon tax.

However, Mr Abbott insisted on having the last word about the carbon tax,

YouTube/Tony Abbott

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