101 Days After, MH370 Possible Crash Site ‘Hotspot’ Found: ‘It Was No Accident’ Says Kiwi Pilot And Journalist

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By jaskiran kaur | June 18, 2014 5:16 PM EST

Missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 has disappeared on March 8 this year. Even after 101 days of international search efforts, Boeing 777 remains missing.

According to British Satellite Company, the most likely crash site remains unexplored. Meanwhile, book authors claimed the biggest aviation tragedy was not an accident.

REUTERS/Jason Lee
A woman (L), whose son, daughter-in-law and grandson were aboard the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, cries after she and other family members failed to express their appeals to the airline outside its office in Beijing June 11, 2014. Months of searches have failed to turn up any trace of the missing Boeing 777, which disappeared on March 8 carrying 239 passengers and crew shortly after taking off from Kuala Lumpur bound for Beijing. REUTERS/Jason Lee

Inmarsat, a satellite company, is the only firm to render satellite data detailing the final hours of MH370 during the night it went missing. The telecommunications company told the BBC that electronic connections with missing Malaysian MH370 revealed the plane "must have come down in the southern Indian Ocean."  The company's scientists were able to locate the "hotspot" on the ocean floor where the aircraft likely crashed. But the area has not yet been searched.

"Inmarsat's scientists could tell from the timings and frequencies of the connection signals that the plane had to have come down in the southern Indian Ocean," the report read.

But the investigators and vessels investigating the area never reached the "hotspot" as it followed the path hinted by sonar detections. The hotspot is located at some distance from the sites that were being searched before.

Inmarsat scientists are confident in tracking the most likely crash site. According to the report, the previous searches were focused on the pings that they thought were coming from blackbox of the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, but found nothing.

"It was by no means an unrealistic location," Inmarsat's Chris Ashton told Horizon of BBC.

"But it was further to the north and east than our area of highest probability."

With the help of the gathered data, the company scientists designed a series of arcs across the Indian Ocean where the system last communicated with MH370.

"We can identify a path that matches exactly with all those frequency measurements and with the timing measurements and lands on the final arc at a particular location, which then gives us a sort of a hotspot area on the final arc where we believe the most likely area is," informed Ashton to BBC.

The search was reportedly on break. But when it resumes Inmarsat's "hotspot" will be the focus of the investigation.

Meanwhile, a commercial pilot cited the disappearance of MH370 was "deliberate" and "calculated," according to Stuff.Co.Nz.

In their book titled, "Good Night Malaysia 370: The Truth Behind the Loss of Flight 370," Pilot Ewan Wilson and New Zealand Reported Geoff Taylor made these shocking claims.

Ewan Wilson is a former chief executive of the two airlines and holds qualifications in transport safety investigations. Geoff Taylor is a Fairfax journalist. They did detailed research on the disappearance of the Malaysian flight.

"What happened to MH370 was no accident. It was deliberate and it was calculated and it should never have been allowed to happen," Ewan Wilson said.

The book was based on their intensive study and interviews of the authorities and family members of MH370's Pilot Zaharie Ahmad Shad. They visited Malaysia to gather all the evidence. The book will be published in July.

Missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 vanished three months ago with 239 passengers onboard while traveling from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Even after 101 days, no traces of wreckage or debris from missing Boeing 777 have been found.

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(Photo: REUTERS/Jason Lee / )
A woman (L), whose son, daughter-in-law and grandson were aboard the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, cries after she and other family members failed to express their appeals to the airline outside its office in Beijing June 11, 2014. Months of searches have failed to turn up any trace of the missing Boeing 777, which disappeared on March 8 carrying 239 passengers and crew shortly after taking off from Kuala Lumpur bound for Beijing. REUTERS/Jason Lee
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