Call of Duty Likely to be Linked with Several Teenage Deaths, Coroner Claims

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By Sounak Mukhopadhyay | May 28, 2014 9:41 AM EST

Call of Duty must be investigated for its influence on children as four teenage boys who killed themselves used to play it on a regular basis in their lifetime, suggests a coroner.

According to coroner John Pollard, it was a great concern for him to know that several hearings which he presided over recently featured the video game. Pollard was a part of the investigations of the victims of serial killer Harold Shipman. He noticed a relation between the adult video game and several teenage deaths. This is not the first time Pollard showed his concern for the game. Earlier he asked parents to discourage their children from using Call of Duty after a 14-year-old boy hanged himself to death.

The most recent hearing is in connection with 16-year-old William Menzies, the brilliant schoolboy who suffocated himself to death in his bedroom. He used to play Call of Duty all the time, Daily Mail reported. William used to study A levels in psychology, politics, physics and biology. He studied in one of the most prestigious grammar schools in UK. There was no known issue of depression or stress in William before he killed himself. His lifeless body was discovered with his hands tied behind his back in his Greater Manchester house. 14-year-old Callum Green hanged himself in February 2012. He and his stepfather had played Call of Duty before he killed himself.

Pollard recorded a suicide verdict for William. "I have to say, and this is after three or four inquests into the deaths of teens, the Call of Duty game seems to be figuring in recent activity before death. It concerns me greatly," he said, "'It has figured in a number of deaths which I'm investigating. I suspect but I don't know because I don't have enough evidence, that William may have been experimenting with something or deliberately intending but we haven't got evidence. There was no note or indication he was feeling down or distressed."

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