Women Hate Premature Ejaculation too, Study Reveals

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By Silvana Peters | May 23, 2014 4:09 PM EST

A study on premature ejaculation have shown that it is not only men that are affected by the condition but also women, as partners.

According to a recent survey that focus on wives and girlfriends who are with partners that struggle with premature ejaculation, "it [the sexual disorder] also causes increased psychological strain and stress in women," says clinical psychologist Andrea Burri of the University of Zurich.

With 1,500 women polled from Mexico, Italy and South Korea between the ages of 20 and 50, about 40 per cent claim that while ejaculation control is vastly important when it comes to satisfactory intercourse, they aren't necessarily frustrated at duration and looking to prolong intercourse, rather want their sexual needs addressed by their partner.

"It is not the short duration of the act of lovemaking that is primarily regarded as the main source of sexual frustration by the majority of women, but the fact that the man is focused too strongly on delaying ejaculation. As a result, he ignores the sexual needs of the woman and is unable to satisfy her individual desires," reports the study.

The entire report has been published in The Journal of Sexual Medicine. The researchers utilised validated and self-constructed questionnaires with the objective of assessing women's perception of premature ejaculation, relationship satisfaction and quality, and sexual functioning and satisfaction.

The findings ultimately revealed that premature ejaculation causes psychological stress and frustration in women and "much like the man, she avoids sexual contact for fear of rejection and the resulting trauma for her own sexuality," explained Burri.

This then puts the relationship in jeopardy because for most women, the priority is on sexual creativity and the intimacy experienced. As their partners continue to be inattentive to their needs, the relationship as whole may be called into question.

Burri continued, "Interestingly, lengthy coitus is primarily important for women who do not have any trouble climaxing," but for those who rarely - or never - orgasm, the length is secondary.

While most of the women have claimed to have been more satisfied in previous relationships where the sexual disorder wasn't present, "This was primarily linked to the fact that too much importance is attached to the problem of premature ejaculation in the current relationship."

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