Goodbye, Sagging Breasts: New Form of Plastic Surgery Promises Firmer Bosoms Using Bra-Shaped Silicone Sling Implants

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By Vittorio Hernandez | May 22, 2014 8:53 AM EST

A new medical produce offers a possible solution to a female problem that comes with age - sagging mammary glands.

The European Union had already approved the new form of plastic surgery developed by Orbix Medical, while the U.S. is reviewing the procedure which involves implanting bra-shaped silicone slings underneath the skin.


British Nagor makes 75,000 silicone breast implants in the UK a year (Reuters)

A surgeon inserts the silicon cups underneath the breast tissue and keeps it in place by attaching the slings to the rib cage bones using titanium screws. The procedure is over in 45 minutes.

Due to its promise of minimal scarring, the procedure could one day replace the traditional breast-lift procedure.

Since its first clinical trial in Belgium in 2009, over 60 such procedures have been performed throughout Europe where the EU has provided it a CE mark, allowing its sale in the bloc.

The cost is about $2,000 more expensive than the traditional breast implants, but the UK is reportedly planning to offer it for free to NHS breast reduction or breast cancer patients, reported The Sun. Guy's & St Thomas Hospital in London charges £6,000 for the procedure.

However, some medical practitioners seek a longer period of observation to determine its side effects.

Professor Kefah Mokbel of the London Breast Institute pointed out, quoted by MailOnline, "These cups go under the skin, so the question is do we know the long-term effect to women, will they develop scaring and will the internal bra affect the shape of the breast in the long term? It is premature to say it is a solution to the issue of sagging breasts."

She added the CE certification refers to the safety of the materials used, not on the procedure.

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British Nagor makes 75,000 silicone breast implants in the UK a year (Reuters)
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