NOAA Says April 2014 Ties with April 2010 as Warmest on Record, Global Average Temperatures to Soar Higher with Looming El Niño

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By Esther Tanquintic-Misa | May 21, 2014 4:14 PM EST

Firefighters battle a blaze in San Marcos, California May 14, 2014. More than 20 structures, including several homes, burned to the ground and thousands of people were ordered to evacuate on Wednesday, as a wind-lashed wildfire roared out of control in the heart of a Southern California coastal community. The so-called Poinsettia Fire, which erupted shortly before 11 a.m. in Carlsbad, some 25 miles north of San Diego, quickly became the most pressing battle for crews fighting flames across the region amid soaring temperatures and hot Santa Ana winds. REUTERS/Sam Hodgson
Firefighters battle a blaze in San Marcos, California May 14, 2014. More than 20 structures, including several homes, burned to the ground and thousands of people were ordered to evacuate on Wednesday, as a wind-lashed wildfire roared out of control in the heart of a Southern California coastal community. The so-called Poinsettia Fire, which erupted shortly before 11 a.m. in Carlsbad, some 25 miles north of San Diego, quickly became the most pressing battle for crews fighting flames across the region amid soaring temperatures and hot Santa Ana winds. REUTERS/Sam Hodgson

NOAA's latest monthly climate has disclosed that April 2014 has tied with April 2010 as the warmest month on record.

Among the salient findings were:

  • The combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces for April 2014 tied with 2010 as the highest on record for the month, at 0.77°C (1.39°F) above the 20th century average of 13.7°C (56.7°F).
  • The global land surface temperature was 1.35°C (2.43°F) above the 20th century average of 8.1°C (46.5°F), marking the third warmest April on record. For the ocean, the April global sea surface temperature was 0.55°C (0.99°F) above the 20th century average of 16.0°C (60.9°F), also the third highest for April on record.
  • The combined global land and ocean average surface temperature for the January-April period (year-to-date) was 0.64°C (1.15°F) above the 20th century average of 12.6°C (54.8°F), the sixth warmest such period on record.

"Many areas of the world were much warmer than average, with much of central Siberia observing temperatures more than 9°F (5°C) above the 1981-2010 average. This region, along with parts of eastern Australia and scattered regions in every major ocean basin, were record warm. Parts of southern and eastern Canada, the northern U.S., and southern Kazakhstan were cooler than average. No land areas were record cold...," NOAA said.

Read: El Niño-pocalypse 2014: NOAA Map Shows Impact Severity around the Globe; How Commodities Move During Such Weather Event (PHOTOS)

Scientists predict the April 2014 global warmth may extend further due to a looming El Niño.

"Ocean temperatures are continuing to warm," Jessica Blunden, a scientist at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, North Carolina, told Mashable. She noted a three- to four-month lag usually occurs between when El Niño events form and when they show up in global average temperature trends.

If the feared El Niño weather phenomenon does materialise, 2015 global average temperatures will even soar higher than they would be due to manmade global warming alone. "I think that if we move into El Niño, you're going to see the temperatures start to increase," Blunden said.

Read: El Niño-pocalypse: NASA Photo Shows 2014 Weather Event to be the Worst in Decades, Severe Than 1997?

 

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(Photo: / )
Firefighters battle a blaze in San Marcos, California May 14, 2014. More than 20 structures, including several homes, burned to the ground and thousands of people were ordered to evacuate on Wednesday, as a wind-lashed wildfire roared out of control in the heart of a Southern California coastal community. The so-called Poinsettia Fire, which erupted shortly before 11 a.m. in Carlsbad, some 25 miles north of San Diego, quickly became the most pressing battle for crews fighting flames across the region amid soaring temperatures and hot Santa Ana winds. REUTERS/Sam Hodgson
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