The Most Expensive Breakfast in Australia Costs $11,000, When Eaten With PM Tony Abbott

  • Rate this Story
  • 0
  • 0

By Vittorio Hernandez | May 1, 2014 9:23 AM EST

Chinese President Xi Jinping (4th L) attends a meeting with Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott (4th R) at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, April 11, 2014. REUTERS/Parker Song/Pool (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS)
Chinese President Xi Jinping (4th L) attends a meeting with Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott (4th R) at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, April 11, 2014. REUTERS/Parker Song/Pool (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS)

In Canberra, a breakfast made of bacon and eggs, muffin and tea would cost $11,000. The whopping bill is because breaking bread with Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott comes with the breakfast package.

The special offer is being made to business observers. It also features an opportunity to rub elbows with ministers in the Coalition cabinet, get briefings on the state of the Senate and as a bonus, have afternoon tea with chiefs of staff, reports the Sydney Morning Herald.

For those on a tighter budget, there is a standalone policy luncheon costing $250. But those who will buy the $11,000 package are also included in the policy luncheon.

The breakfast, which be on June 27 as part of the 57th yearly Liberal Party federal council meeting, is actually a masked way of raising funds for the party and is $1,000 short of the $12,000 minimum political contribution that must be reported to the Australian Electoral Commission.

In the past, the Labor Partywas criticised for holding business observer programmes with hefty bills. In late April, New South Wales Premier Barry O'Farrell quit due to the public furor caused by his non-declaration of a $3,000 bottle of wine gift from lobbyist Nick di Girolamo.

Despite the exorbitant price of the breakfast, it may still attract Aussies who may want to hear the latest on Coalition policies, particularly the proposed deficit tax for people earning $80,000 a year.

Even Liberal members have complained about being caught unawares by the proposal from Mr Abbott. So if the deficit tax would be tackled during the breakfast, some business observers may find the $11,000 bill worth it because it would give them the opportunity to watch party members bicker among themselves.

To contact the editor, e-mail:

(Photo: / )
Chinese President Xi Jinping (4th L) attends a meeting with Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott (4th R) at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, April 11, 2014. REUTERS/Parker Song/Pool (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS)
  • Rate this Story
  • 0
  • 0
This article is copyrighted by IBTimes.com.au, the business news leader

Join the Conversation

IBTimes TV
E-Newsletters

We value your privacy. Your email address will not be shared.