Viral Video: Snake Takes Another Beating, This Time from an Australian Spider

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By Vittorio Hernandez | April 24, 2014 9:02 AM EST

More battle for supremacy in the jungle continues to take place, and this time the featured video pits the snake against a spider in Cairns, Australia (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j65i5PDUeT4).

Reuters
Scientists are interested in using spider silk, which is stronger than steel and lighter than Kevlar, for a variety purposes.

The match, which lasted for 60 minutes, involved a Gold silk orb-weave spider that could grow up to 6.9 centimetres in body length, excluding its legs, and a half-a-metre long brown tree snake which dines on birds, lizards and small mammals.

Unfortunately for the snake, it fell from a tree and was caught in the spider's web, making it impossible for the snake to escape. The insect world's David and triumphed over the jungle's Goliath this time, although the story would likely have a different ending had it been an adult python that was involved in the battle for which one would end up as the meal.

Daniel Reardon chanced upon the unique battle, took a video of the fight and reduced it to a one minute clip which he posted in a popular video sharing site. The video has so far more than 600,000 views.

Similar wild creature battles have also become viral on the Internet as animals that fight it out for survival often appear to an uneven match with one animal usually significantly larger than its opponent; often the beast's planned breakfast, lunch or dinner.

A snake had won over a crocodile, but in one instance the croc ate its way out of the slithering creature. When the alligator tried to bully an electric eel, the match produced no winners but became food for other creatures of the wild as both eel and gator died.

When a python and another gator had an encounter in a marsh, the bout proved to be difficult to settle who would win, so both animals walked away from the battle.

In some instances, the smaller creature prevailed like what was discovered by researchers in Macedonia when they saw a centipede crawl out of a dead viper. Apparently, the snake ate the centipede alive, which in turn exacted its revenge by eating the insides of the viper.

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(Photo: Reuters / )
Scientists are interested in using spider silk, which is stronger than steel and lighter than Kevlar, for a variety purposes.
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