New Zealanders in Australia Labelled 'Carping Kiwis' After Coming Out as 'Unhappiest Migrants' in Survey

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By Reissa Su | April 22, 2014 6:17 PM EST

New Zealanders living and working in Australia have been called "carping Kiwis" and "South Sea Poms." A recent survey has revealed that Kiwis are the unhappiest migrants in Australia. According to a study by Monash University in Melbourne, New Zealanders were the most likely to be discriminated against and dissatisfied with their financial status. Kiwis in Australia also did not feel safer and do not view Australians as "nice."

Reuters
A Maori warrior performs during an official welcome ceremony for the Rugby World Cup in Auckland September 3, 2011.

In the survey, 40 per cent of Kiwi migrants in Australia revealed they were "dissatisfied" or "very dissatisfied" with their financial situation, while 46 per cent thought they were either poor or struggling or just getting by.

Kiwi migrants do not think Australians are friendly, caring and hospitable people. About one per cent suggested Australia's hospitality and friendliness were among the things they liked since leaving New Zealand.

New Zealanders have become suspicious of other people, and more than a quarter of the respondents said they experience discrimination twice as more as the British.

Queensland's Sunday Mail labeled New Zealanders in Australia as the "carping Kiwis" after the results of the survey were revealed. The newspaper said the "carping Kiwis" had surpassed the "whingeing Poms" as the hardest people to please in Australia.

The Sunday Mail carried the story with a graphic headline, "If you don't like it, leave." A 40-year-old Kiwi living in Australia's Gold Coast was not surprised about the results. Tim Baker said many Kiwis in Australia had "good reason" to complain and grumble.  He said they were "second-class citizens" in the country.  He said he got nothing after moving to Australia with his Australian wife and raising Australian children. He has also worked in the country his whole life and bought property.

Professor Andrew Markus of Monash University said the survey results had revealed Kiwis were a special group. In 2001, a visa was introduced to allow them to live in Australia indefinitely. However, despite paying taxes, Kiwis were not included in many welfare benefits entitled to their Australian counterparts living in New Zealand. 

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(Photo: Reuters / )
A Maori warrior performs during an official welcome ceremony for the Rugby World Cup in Auckland September 3, 2011.
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