US Airways NSFW Tweet, Feast for Twitter Users but Eye-Opener for Businessmen

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By Ma Evelyn Castino Quilas | April 16, 2014 6:19 PM EST

While Twitter users feasted over the US Airways inadvertent post of a not safe for work (NSFW) photo on Twitter, many businessmen could deeply reflect over this accident to keep their company's reputation in good standing.

The photograph showed a woman's reproductive organ with a model plane in a very compromising position which was accidentally sent as a reply to a customer complaint from a Twitter user @ElleRafter.

The customer expressed her annoyance over the one hour flight delay to Portland, Oregon as the US Airways plane she was riding stayed on the runway at Charlotte, North Carolina for an hour.

According to a report from Chicago Tribune, the airway's official Twitter account @AmericanAir sent a tweet, "We welcome feedback, Elle. If your travel is complete, you can detail it here for review and follow-up." What was supposedly a landing page to the company's customer service on the word here was linked to the pornographic image that quickly became a frenzy of active users on the social media.

With more than 420,000 followers on US Airway's Twitter account, the photo had been retweeted many times with a number of NSFW hashtag. Some followers even commented ever since the birth of Twitter, that particular post was the worst tweet a well-known brand has ever made.

Upon realizing the mistake, US Airways have quickly removed the tweet after an hour but the blunder had already caused damage to the prestigious company's image which many businessmen could relate.  

In a news report from Zdnet, the Chief Executive Officer of Crowd Control James Leavesley explained: "This is the classic example of where one mistake can damage a reputation in minutes.  Using validation software means users can be set up so their content is sent to a holding pen, before going live, that will then be authorized by a manager/senior member of staff."

Businessmen could prevent similar instances from happening by hiring a trusted third party to review and monitor all the tweets from customers. The company's responses should also be moderated  prior to send out so that regrettable messages can be avoided just like this infamous case of US Airways.

We can just hope that the company will be more cautious on its future activities on Twitter and other social media sites.

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