MH370 Search: Aussie Chief Confirms Fifth Signal Not Related to Plane; Taliban Involvement, Cover-up Suspected

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By Reissa Su | April 11, 2014 5:07 PM EST

The fifth signal detected by the Australian aircraft  on April 10 was declared "unlikely to be related to the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370.

REUTERS/SAMSUL SAID
A woman places a lighted candle on a poster with messages expressing hope for passengers of the missing Malaysia Airlines plane MH370 during a candlelight vigil in Petaling Jaya, near Kuala Lumpur on 16 March, 2014.

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According to Australian Chief Search Coordinator Angus Houston, the latest acoustic signal was not from the black boxes of the aircraft and there was "no major breakthrough" in the continuing search. He said the Australian Joint Acoustic Analysis Centre will continue to perform further analysis.

But Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott has told Chinese reporters on April 11 that he was "very confident" that the signals picked up by the Australian vessel belonged to the Malaysia Airline Flight MH370. The reports were not clear if Abbott referred to the four other signals that were detected earlier.

Cover-up Accusations

Accusations of the Malaysian cover-up have not died down as social media and the Internet are abuzz with reports of conspiracy theories and possible scenarios. Malaysian Opposition Leader Anwar Ibrahim has accused the Malaysian government of hiding information, according to his interview with the Daily Telegraph.

He said Malaysia's radar system can detect any change of an aircraft's course. He added he was "baffled" why the highly sophisticated Marconi radar system of Malaysia was unable to immediately detect Flight MH370's deviation from its course.

He believed it was not possible that the missing plane could have crossed at least four Malaysia provinces without being detected by radar. He was firm in his belief that the "government knows more than us."

No Debris Means Plane Hijacked by Taliban Group?

Malaysian authorities previously investigated the theory that the missing Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 could have been navigated under the radar to the bases on the boarder of Afghanistan and North West Pakistan believed to be under the Taliban territory.

According to the Independent, Malaysian authorities had requested for diplomatic permission. Four hours after the Flight MH370 went missing and lost ground control communications, the aircraft had reportedly sent signals to a satellite.

According to a U.S. official who asked for anonymity, the signals could have meant the Malaysian Airlines plan was still in the air for hundreds of kilometers or more. Reports explored this possibility where large areas of the southern half of Afghanistan are controlled by the Afghan Taliban, while some areas of northwest Pakistan, adjacent to or near to the Afghan border, are ruled by the Pakistani Taliban. 

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(Photo: REUTERS/SAMSUL SAID / )
A woman places a lighted candle on a poster with messages expressing hope for passengers of the missing Malaysia Airlines plane MH370 during a candlelight vigil in Petaling Jaya, near Kuala Lumpur on 16 March, 2014.
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