Malaysia Airlines MH370: Reasons Behind Lack of Debris

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By Esther Tanquintic-Misa | April 10, 2014 4:41 PM EST

Either the month-long missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 was operated and flown by a very skilled pilot or someone else right smack into the ocean but still largely intact and immediately sank to the bottom of the ocean as one mammoth piece that's why there's no floating debris visible anywhere on top of the waters, or Cyclone Gillian could have had a hand in the disappearance of the debris.

AMSA
Two more sets of signals possibly linked to the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 have been detected, Australian authorities said Wednesday. (Photo: AMSA Press Release)

The assumptions came from experts inside the Malaysian Airlines Flight MH 370 Joint Agency Coordination Centre. They strongly believed any of those two theories were the reason for the lack of debris from the ill-fated Malaysian carrier that went missing on March 8.

"It is painstaking work to scour a massive area but we are perplexed about the lack of wreckage," news.com.au quoted an unidentified source, noting the lack of flotsam has left authorities baffled. "We expect to find some debris such as the wing (fuel) tanks that are air tight and would float."

Cyclone Gillian had hampered SAR operations for flight MH370 in late March with its strong winds and rough seas.

On Thursday, the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 resumed in the Indian Ocean participated by 14 planes and 13 ships.

Thursday's search focuses on area spanning 57,923 square kilometres, located about 2280 kilometres northwest of Perth, according to the federal government's Joint Agency Co-ordination Centre (JACC).

But Angus Houston, former Defence chief and lead of the JACC, revealed the Australian Defence vessel Ocean Shield failed to detect again the underwater signals it first received on Saturday and Tuesday believed to be emanating from the downed aircraft.

"They continued the pinger operations through the night," Mr Houston said. "They haven't picked up anything. I don't know how much longer they'll go for because the likelihood on Day 34 is that the batteries must be getting near their use-by date."

The Australian Defence vessel Ocean Shield still has about 12 days left to isolate the signals it receives. The battery life of the locator beacons attached to the flight data and cockpit voice recorders is expected to last up to 45 days.

On Wednesday, aircraft and ships reported spotting a large number of objects. Only a small number were recovered.

But JACC said that none of the recovered items were believed to be associated with Malaysia Airlines MH370.

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(Photo: AMSA / )
Two more sets of signals possibly linked to the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 have been detected, Australian authorities said Wednesday. (Photo: AMSA Press Release)
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