Court Acquits Melbourne Babysitter of Baby’s Death, Parents Now at Loss What Really Caused Only Child to Die

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By Esther Tanquintic-Misa | March 27, 2014 5:16 PM EST

A court in Victoria, Australia has acquitted a Melbourne babysitter for the death of a 10-month-old girl left in her care.

Anthony and Kat Murphy had dropped baby Chloe off at the Kensington home of babysitter Ketapat Jenkin in December 2010 to enjoy a night out together. When they picked up the child three hours later, they claimed she was already unresponsive.

REUTERS/Susana Vera
ATTENTION EDITORS: SPANISH LAW REQUIRES THAT THE FACES OF MINORS ARE MASKED IN PUBLICATIONS WITHIN SPAIN A baby looks at clothes as her family shops at a Lefties store in Madrid March 14, 2014. While Inditex's Zara and other brands have seen tepid sales growth in Spain in recent years, the company has quietly beefed up Lefties, opening new stores and making them more glamorous as it fights to keep foreign chains from eating into market share. For now Inditex barely acknowledges the existence of Lefties - perhaps nervous that the former outlet store for unsold Zara items could degrade its other brands. Picture taken March 14, 2014. REUTERS/Susana Vera

Baby Chloe laid limp in Ms Jenkins's arms and was struggling to breathe. She died three days later in the hospital. Tests revealed she suffered horrific and fatal brain injuries. One arm bore several fractures.

The Murphy's charged 30-year old Ms Jenkins with manslaughter. She pleaded not guilty and denied all allegations.

The parents claimed baby Chloe was perfectly well, acting happily and acting normally when left in the care of Ms Jenkins.

Ms Jenkins, during an exclusive interview with the Herald Sun days after Chloe died, said she had no idea what caused the injuries on the baby.

She did notice though that Chloe was struggling to breathe. She told the parents to go straight to the hospital.

"If I was a bad woman and wanted to kill her, I wouldn't tell them to go to the hospital," she said.

Lawyers defending Ms Jenkins said it was likely the baby got injured in a fall. There was no credible evidence to tie-up Ms Jenkins to the injuries and death of baby Chloe.

The jury took three days to deliberate and come out with their verdict.

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(Photo: REUTERS/Susana Vera / )
ATTENTION EDITORS: SPANISH LAW REQUIRES THAT THE FACES OF MINORS ARE MASKED IN PUBLICATIONS WITHIN SPAIN A baby looks at clothes as her family shops at a Lefties store in Madrid March 14, 2014. While Inditex's Zara and other brands have seen tepid sales growth in Spain in recent years, the company has quietly beefed up Lefties, opening new stores and making them more glamorous as it fights to keep foreign chains from eating into market share. For now Inditex barely acknowledges the existence of Lefties - perhaps nervous that the former outlet store for unsold Zara items could degrade its other brands. Picture taken March 14, 2014. REUTERS/Susana Vera
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