Broken Pieces of Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 Suspected to Be Found at Indian Coast

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By Sounak Mukhopadhyay | March 20, 2014 12:30 PM EST

Update on March 24, 2014: Flight MH370 'crashed in south Indian Ocean' - Malaysia PM

REUTERS/Damir Sagolj/Files
A man watches a large screen showing different flights at the departure hall of Kuala Lumpur International Airport in this March 13, 2014 file photo. The unexplained fate of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 has thrown the spotlight on some satellite technologies that will make it easier in future for authorities to track and communicate with aircraft over water and uninhabited areas. Picture taken March 13, 2014.

Indian fishermen found broken pieces of "something" at a beach on Wednesday, March 19. It is suspected that it could be the remaining of the missing Malaysian Airlines MH370.

A local news channel reported about the fishermen at Kutta Gouduru beach in south coastal Andhra Pradesh, a South Indian state. The fishermen then informed the police who suspected that the "broken pieces" could be the remaining of MH370 which might have crashed either into the Bay of Bengal or into the Indian Ocean. Interestingly, a Malaysian news channel reported a couple of days back that the missing plane might have crashed in similar locations, India Today reported.

The Telugu channel also reported that top officials were alerted by concerned authorities even though there is hardly any official confirmation if the broken pieces have any possibility of being the remaining of the missing Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370. Even after 11 days of the flight having disappeared on March 8 with no trace whatsoever until now, this could be one of several other speculations which have been doing the rounds.

Meanwhile, there is still no trace of the missing Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370. However, in a fresh update, investigators said that certain data got deleted from the captain's home flight simulator, but they were in the process of recovering it; according to Nine MSN.

The simulator was removed from Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah's residence on Saturday, March 15, after the plane was suspected to have diverted from its usual route. Even though some data was deleted, there is no evidence that the captain was involved in any kind of "wrongdoing." Malaysia has also asked the FBI to help it out in recovering the deleted data from the simulator.

The Guardian has quoted the Transport Minister of Malaysia, saying that no passenger, crew or pilot should be accused until there is any significant proof against them. According to the minister, military officials denied the claims that the plane was seen flying over a remote island in the Maldives.

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(Photo: REUTERS/Damir Sagolj/Files / )
A man watches a large screen showing different flights at the departure hall of Kuala Lumpur International Airport in this March 13, 2014 file photo. The unexplained fate of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 has thrown the spotlight on some satellite technologies that will make it easier in future for authorities to track and communicate with aircraft over water and uninhabited areas. Picture taken March 13, 2014.
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