Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370: Burning Spotted, Hijack Scenario Extremely Possible

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By Rachelle Corpuz | March 13, 2014 5:17 PM EST

A significant lead that could finally help determine why Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 had gone missing is currently being worked on by aviation experts and authorities. Could it be the evidence that everyone has been searching for regarding the fate of missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370?

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A relative (woman in white) of a passenger onboard Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 cries as she talks on her mobile phone at the Beijing Capital International Airport on 8 March, 2014.

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A report by BBC said that the deputy general director of Vietnam's air traffic management, Doan Huu Gia, was sent an email by a New Zealander employed as an oil rig worker off Vung Tau in Vietnam, claiming that he saw a burning object in the sky during about the same time that the Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 had been reported missing.

Read more: Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370: New Zealander Mike McKay Saw Plane Go Down in Flames, Officials Investigate Email Details

ABC News Correspondent and anchor Bob Woodruff got hold of the letter, read it from the snapshot and he posted on his Twitter account.

Meanwhile, as the search and investigation efforts about the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 triple, with the Chinese government now examining satellite images that could be linked to the claims of the New Zealander, another area that is currently being looked on is the transponder of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370. The fact that the transponder stopped sending information means something had definitely gone wrong.

Veteran pilot and aviation expert John Nance told CNN that it is difficult to fathom why a Boeing 777 jetliner would all of sudden have no means of communicating with air traffic control units. Mr. Nance added that even if the transponder of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 quit working, the crew should have at least tried some other means to send information.

CNN further reported that when the Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 stopped sending identifying transponder codes, it flew off course before completely disappearing from the radar screens. For this reason, some speculations that the Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 was hijacked came about.

According to longtime pilot Kit Darby, the transponder may have been turned off on purpose, but the there is really no support to prove that it has indeed been turned off with intent. The president of Aviation Information Resource also told CNN that it is possible that the transponder will stop working because of a power failure, and even if there is such a failure in the power supply, the jetliner can manage to stay flying for another hour.

However, Mr. Nance thinks otherwise. He said that the power system of a jetliner is not easily broken and the transponder consume only a small amount of power. He firmly believes that someone could have turned off the transponder.

If Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 has been hijacked, shouldn't the hijackers need to have access to the cockpit? The whole world is still at a loss as to what really happened. There are so many speculations and questions that do not have answers yet. Families and relatives of the 239 people on board continue to sustain a painful saga of sentiments.

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(Photo: REUTERS / Kim Kyung-Hoon)
A relative (woman in white) of a passenger onboard Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 cries as she talks on her mobile phone at the Beijing Capital International Airport on 8 March, 2014.
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