Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 Sudden Disappearance: Facts, Theories & Hypotheses

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By Riza Ornos | March 12, 2014 3:48 PM EST

With so many stories behind the Malaysian Airlines flight MH370, many people are now confused between the fact and fiction behind its abrupt disappearance. The mystery of the flight's vanishing act has left the world wondering that even the world's top air safety authorities are still in the dark on the technicalities and its disappearance is simply inexplicable.

REUTERS/Jason Lee
Journalists wait in a conference room for a news conference regarding the missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370, at a hotel in Beijing March 8, 2014. The Malaysia Airlines flight carrying 227 passengers and 12 crew from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing lost contact with air traffic controllers early on Saturday, the airline said in a statement, the plane likely missing in Vietnamese airspace. Flight MH370, operating a Boeing B777-200 aircraft left Kuala Lumpur at 12.21 a.m. (1621 GMT Friday) and had been expected to land in the Chinese capital at 6.30 a.m. (2230 GMT) the same day. March 7, 2014

Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 has been reported to disappear from the sky with no visual and contact in the early hours of Saturday, March 8. Heading to Beijing, the flight was carrying some 277 passengers and 12 crew members.

A "highly unusual" incident, the disappearance of the plane poses a lot of questions and many conspiracy theories are formed as the day go by without any news about it. According to reports of The Controversial Files, the transponder and tracking systems of the plane were turned off at some point as the plane was flying low.

Now families of the passengers of the plane are still wondering and still hopping for positive news about the plane's vanishing act. "For now, it seems simply inexplicable," says Paul Hayes, director of safety and insurance at Ascent Worldwide in an interview posted in Natural News.

The fact is all Boeing 777 commercial jets are packed with black box recorders that can survive any on-board explosion and it can transmit locator signals for at least 30 days after falling into the ocean. So, now the question is where is the black box of flight MH370? Also, many of the parts of the aircraft are naturally buoyant and will definitely float on the surface of the water, including the seat cushion.

Air traffic controllers know exactly where the aircraft is before it vanished into thin air, they know about its location, elevation and airspeed. These three pieces of vital information could help them estimate the location of the airline.

With these facts, the Web site concludes that the aircraft did not explode but it vanished into oblivion. While The Controversial Files are speculating some reasons for its disappearance which include an alien attack, pilot suicide, it could be in the jungles and water of Vietnam, terrorist attack and mid-air disintegration.

"To completely disintegrate a 777, the whole plane must be filled with high explosives," says professor Cheng Wei in an interview posted on South China Morning Post. He also adds that the "jet plane's hull was built for high internal pressure, and the force of explosion would be quickly dispersed from the hole."

"Right now, all the facts tell us is that the plane is no longer flying," says David Newberry, a pilot and accredited aviation accident investigator. "They must first find out where they're supposed to look."

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(Photo: REUTERS/Jason Lee / )
Journalists wait in a conference room for a news conference regarding the missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370, at a hotel in Beijing March 8, 2014. The Malaysia Airlines flight carrying 227 passengers and 12 crew from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing lost contact with air traffic controllers early on Saturday, the airline said in a statement, the plane likely missing in Vietnamese airspace. Flight MH370, operating a Boeing B777-200 aircraft left Kuala Lumpur at 12.21 a.m. (1621 GMT Friday) and had been expected to land in the Chinese capital at 6.30 a.m. (2230 GMT) the same day. March 7, 2014
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