Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370: Facts You Don’t Know

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By Rachelle Corpuz | March 12, 2014 12:04 PM EST

The search for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 widens but unfortunately, there are still no significant new leads that could really explain what happened in the aircraft boarded with a total of 239 passengers. The shocking disappearance of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 has left experts and authorities baffled and stuck to yet another unsolvable mystery in the aviation history.

REUTERS
Military personnel look out of a Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF) C130 transport plane as they search for the missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 plane over the South China Sea March 11, 2014.

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What People Know

The Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, a Boeing 777-200ER ascent from Kuala Lumpur early morning at 12:41 am on March 8. After approximately a 2,700-mile voyage of nearly six hours, the jetliner was scheduled to arrive in Beijing at 6:30 am. However, the air traffic controllers lost track of the jetliner at around 1:30 am above the sea in the middle of Malaysia and Vietnam, barely an hour before it took off. A Malaysian air force official told CNN that the jetliner was headed on a route opposite of its original destination and had resigned transmitting identifying transponder codes before it vanished.

What People Don't Know

Here are some facts about the shocking disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 that people aren't being told about, as reported by the Natural News.

1.     All Boeing 777 commercial jets have black box recorders, also known as flight data recorder or cockpit voice recorder, which can withstand any explosion aboard. It records all sounds inside any aircraft, such as explosion, voice, and even noise. What is even remarkable about these black box recorders is that they are robust enough to repel the physical and blazing force of ammos or bombs. Like some scenes portrayed in the movies when an airplane crashes, the pingers of the black box recorder get activated and emit a tone. However, it is not known yet whether the Malaysia Airline flight MH370 really crashed into the ocean or somewhere else. If the jetliner crashed into the waters, the sound that the black box recorder emits can only be heard at a limited distance.

2.     All black box recorders can send signals to pinpoint its location for 30 days even after it fell into the ocean. Up to this point, the black box recorder has not been found yet. It only means that the device could have broken down and failed to work. Until the black box recorder is found, the authorities and aviation experts will be likely to be unaware of what really happened. Where is the black box recorder? Locating it is a daunting task because there are certain factors that are involved. Sarah McComb of the National Transportation Safety Board told the Washington Post that the black box recorder "can be compromised if it is buried in silt or sand."

3.     If the Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 crashed into the ocean, some of its parts would have floated in the water like the seat cushion and other non-metal materials of the flying machine. However, the shocking disappearance of the jetliner remains a mystery because none of its debris or parts were discovered yet. Authorities are currently on vast search covering the South China Sea as well as the Malacca Straight for the missing jetliner but no significant clues have been established yet.

4.     The Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 would have left a radar signature if there was an explosion. With so many speculations that mantle over the disappearance of the said jetliner, a mid-air explosion was one assumption that is currently being considered, but is there an explosion big enough to completely pulverize that jetliner leaving no trace of it, as if it completely vanished? It is still a mystery. However, the radar energy of the jetliner would have been reflected in the radar.

It has been few days since the Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 vanished, but there are neither signs of its wreckage nor the 239 people on board. The family and relatives of the passengers can only mourn for their loved ones until more information about the shocking disappearance has been discerned.

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(Photo: REUTERS / Thong Kah Hoong Dennis/Lianhe Zaobao)
Military personnel look out of a Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF) C130 transport plane as they search for the missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 plane over the South China Sea March 11, 2014.
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