Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370: Wife of Kiwi Passenger Prays for Miracle, Air New Zealand Still Believes in Safety Features of Boeing 777s

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By Esther Tanquintic-Misa | March 10, 2014 1:14 PM EST

Paul Weeks was headed to Mongolia to pursue his "dream job" in what he believed will help him provide comfortably for his family. His wife Danica is praying for a miracle that could still come true. Mr Weeks is one of the 239 passengers now part of the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 that went out of the radar over the weekend and disappeared over the South China Sea.

A relative (front) of a passen
A relative (front) of a passenger of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 cries as she walks past journalists at a hotel in Beijing March 9, 2014. The Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777-200ER aircraft carrying 227 passengers and 12 crew was presumed to have crashed off the Vietnamese coast on Saturday, and European officials said two people on board were using false identities. REUTERS/Jason Lee

As rescue and search operations continue to scout for the missing airliner, now entering the third day, Air New Zealand has expressed it still believes in the safety features of the Boeing 777s, particularly the Boeing 777-200ER, and that it has no plans to ground its twin-engined aircraft.

"I would love him to walk through that door one more time and hold him one more time," Mrs Weeks told Australia's Channel 9.

Mr Weeks had to fly to Mongolia and momentarily leave his family as part of the requirements of a new job with Transwest Mongolia as a mechanical engineer. "He was going to be based there for a month on (at a time). It was a really good job and he was going to be paid very well,'' Mr Weeks sister, Sara, said.

Devastated and frustrated over so little information being provided by authorities, Mrs Weeks said she's trying to put on a strong face for her two sons, while ''bracing for the worst."

''I think we're hoping that [the aircraft] landed somewhere nicely and he's sitting having a coffee, but I think when you put two and two together ... it's not looking good.''

Just before Mr Weeks boarded the connecting flight MH370 to Beijing, he emailed his wife, told her he misses them already and that they meant the world to him.

"And I said I love you, you are my world and and he expressed the same back, and that's the last email that I'll hold onto forever."

Mrs Weeks said Lincoln, her eldest son, had already been asking for his dad because the latter failed to show up on a planned Skype session.

"If it is the worst-case scenario, I have two young sons who won't have a father. I will have to be mother and father for them for the rest of their lives," she said.

On Monday, authorities have yet to provide substantial information to the families of the passengers of the ill-fated Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370.

In a report Astro Awani Network, citing information provided by Tan Sri Rodzali Daud, the Royal Malaysian Air Force chief, the airline could have made a possible turn back to the Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA) as per radar records. It added the rescue and search operations, led by Malaysia with assistance from Vietnam, China, Singapore, Indonesia, Thailand, United States, Philippines, and Australia, has now been expended to include the West Coast Straits of Malacca. 

Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 took off at 12.41am on Saturday at Kuala Lumpur and was scheduled to land in Beijing at 6.30 am. It went missing two hours after it took off, at 2.40am.

Sceptics point terrorism as probable cause.

A spokeswoman for Air New Zealand said the incident over the weekend does not relate to all of the Boeing 777-200ER aircraft.  She told Fairfax Media they will continue using their fleet because it has received "no information to suggest there are any concerns relating to the several hundred 777-200ER aircraft operating around the world."

The lack of definite information regarding the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 and its passengers is taking its toll on the families.

"We've been told nothing, just told nothing. You know as much as we do. [Malaysia Airlines] don't know. They have nothing to tell because they don't know. They have no idea - or if they do they're not telling us a thing," Mrs Weeks said.

Mr Weeks is one of two Kiwis flying on that ill-fated plane, along with six Australians.

"I think like everybody I just want to know what happened so I can process that information and start life."

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(Photo: A relative (front) of a passen / )
A relative (front) of a passenger of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 cries as she walks past journalists at a hotel in Beijing March 9, 2014. The Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777-200ER aircraft carrying 227 passengers and 12 crew was presumed to have crashed off the Vietnamese coast on Saturday, and European officials said two people on board were using false identities. REUTERS/Jason Lee
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