Canadian Athlete’s Web Site Blocked in Sochi Olympics for ‘Gay’ Content

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By Sounak Mukhopadhyay | February 10, 2014 8:04 PM EST

Canadian Olympic athlete Justin Kripps' Web site has allegedly been blocked in the 2014 Sochi Olympics. The athlete complained that he had not been able to access his Web site since the day he arrived in Russia to participate in the Winter Olympics.

REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
Demonstrators release balloons with messages against Russia's President Vladimir Putin and anti-gay laws, ahead of the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games, in Rio de Janeiro February 2, 2014.

The Web site has been believed to be blocked due to alleged "gay" content. Kripps is seen posing in his underwear along with other male teammates in a photo. The photo went viral and the Russian authorities might have restricted access to the Web site due to apparent "gay" content on the Web site.

The 27-year-old Canadian athlete was also a part of the video commercial which claimed that the Olympics had always been a little "gay" [Read Here]. The video uses "Don't You Want Me"- the popular tune in 1980s - as its background score. The commercial ends with a "message": "The games have always been a little gay. Let's fight to keep them that way." It shows a 'couple' of male athletes who seem to be practising their 'skills' together. The ad shows the couple of men thrust back and forth while they prepare themselves for taking off luge sledding.

Kripps has been using his Web Site during the Games to keep his fans updated on how the team is getting prepared and such similar references. However, the moment he stepped in Sochi, all his activities related to his Web Site were restricted. When he tries to access the Web Site, a message appears in Russian. It says that the access to the Web Site is "limited."

Going by the message, there can be three probable causes behind the restriction. Either a court order has been issued. Or the Web Site contains information which is banned under the law of the country. Or, the Web Site is using copyrighted materials without proper permission. On the other hand, there is no proper evidence that the Web Site was "officially" banned in the country.

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(Photo: REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes / )
Demonstrators release balloons with messages against Russia's President Vladimir Putin and anti-gay laws, ahead of the Sochi 2014 Olympic Games, in Rio de Janeiro February 2, 2014.
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