New Stats Reveal High Number Of Scandalous Sex Messages Of Smartphone Users To Complete Strangers

  • Rate this Story
  • 0
  • 0

By Christine Lazaro | February 6, 2014 11:51 AM EST


(Video Credit: YouTube/HumanRelationsMedia)

A brand new study has revealed how majority of smartphone users are getting into scandalous messaging as they get involved with sharing intimate, sexy content using their mobile gadgets.

McAfee, a popular security software company, sent out a report saying about 16% of smartphone users go "sexting" even with complete strangers. The survey conducted involved hundreds of adults. The report called 'Love, Relationships, and Technology' also included stats on how individuals send a variety of content. But aside from sharing out daring selfies, many lack the knowledge to tighten up their phones' security which leads to the unintended exposure of their most intimate photos, or even worse, videos. If 16% of the users are discovered to be fond of sexting, 14% go for sending out actual intimate videos, ecanadanow.com noted.

It was also found through the survey that about 40% of those interviewed confessed they have squealed their passwords to others while 20% mentioned they have secretly spied on their partner's activities over social media and texting.

Even popular figures in the entertainment industry and politics have been involved in scandalous smartphone controversies. In the previous year, American Politician Anthony Weiner got into a sexting scandal pushing him eventually resign from his political office as congressman.

The survey also discovered that the ones who were most involved with sexting were within the age range of 18 to 24 with the other batch of percentage about 35 to 44. It was Lookout Mobile Security who handled the poll which comprised of 2,097 adults. One out of every 10 individuals admitted that they save some romantic targets under a different name or what they considered code name in their smartphones' contact list.

It is about time that each smartphone user become more cautious with the security settings of their devices. Make your passcodes strong enough to defend from spying eyes, especially if the sneaky or naughty side of you emerges more often than you expect. For more suggestions on how you can maintain the security of your smartphone, you can check out this link here.

To contact the editor, e-mail:

  • Rate this Story
  • 0
  • 0
This article is copyrighted by IBTimes.com.au, the business news leader

Join the Conversation

IBTimes TV
E-Newsletters

We value your privacy. Your email address will not be shared.